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---Forgive Me--As the other Water Quality Post was only opened a few times in comparison to trolling posts in the thousand Plus , it leads me to believe some Don't care as much as they Proffes to , about Water Quality ---Below are two Front Page Stories by Pamala Wood --First story --Wednesday --Second Story Friday --Please Devour the Words Carefully ---

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
waterway consistently bad
By PAMELA WOOD, Staff Writer
Published October 22, 2008
Like the Chesapeake Bay as a whole, the Severn River suffers from dirty runoff from paved surfaces, a loss of beneficial trees and a suffocating lack of oxygen in the water.

That was the conclusion of several experts who delivered the "State of the Severn River" to more than 60 Advocates gathered in Annapolis last night for a meeting of the Severn River Association.

"The state of the Severn River is similar to the states of the other rivers … It's in dismal shape," said Gerald Winegrad, a University of Maryland professor and former state senator.

Earlier this year, a University of Maryland report card gave Anne Arundel's rivers, including the Severn, a grade of "D-".

Monitoring by volunteers and staffers of the Severn Riverkeeper Program has documented a persistent summertime "dead zone" in the deeper waters of the Round Bay section of the river. In that area, oxygen levels in the water are so low that fish, crabs and other animals can't live there.

"There's a fairly consistent picture," said Dr. Pierre Henkart, a Volunteer who has led the monitoring for the past three summers.

Dead zones are caused when too many nutrients flow into the river, spurring the growth of algae blooms that ultimately suck life-sustaining oxygen from the water. Underwater grasses also suffer when algae blocks sunlight and when they are smothered by sediment and dirt that runs into the river during rainstorms.

If there's good news, it's that bacteria problems that endanger swimmers have lessened somewhat, reported Dr. Sally Hornor of Anne Arundel Community College, who runs the Operation Clearwater testing program.

Part of that is due to homeowners doing a better job picking up pet waste and not feeding geese and ducks, who leave waste on beaches.

But part of that also is due to a lack of rain, so less waste and bacteria is washing into the water.

And Dr. Kurt Riegel of Arnold, president of the river association, said there seems to be increasing interest in helping the river, though people may not know what to do or have a deep commitment.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

RIVER AT A GLANCE
Watershed:
The area draining into the river is 81 square miles. About 85 percent of the watershed is land and 15 percent is water, including streams, creeks and the river itself. About 110,000 people live in the watershed.

Challenges:
Loss of trees, increase of paved 'impervious' surfaces, declining water quality, degraded shoreline, wave action from heavy boat traffic and not much public access to the river.

What the river needs:
Retrofit areas that lack adequate ways for stormwater to soak into the ground; decrease of pollution by individual residents; not allow loss of forests or increase in pollution from new developments; better enforcement of existing pollution and zoning laws; replace failing septic systems with nitrogen-reducing systems; and more awareness of issues by residents and elected officials.

Source: Severn River Association

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Public awareness due to groups like this and people like you is increasing," he said.

The advocates weren't deterred by the challenges, however. After the presentations were over, they peppered the speakers with questions about how they can make a difference.

Mr. Winegrad said it's up to those who already care about the river to get others engaged. And more people need to lobby elected officials to pass tougher pollution laws and better enforce the ones already on the books, he said.

"The answer lies right within all the folks here," he said.

He pointed out that efforts to toughen Critical Area laws, which restrict shoreline construction, and to levy a tax to pay for stormwater fixes faced stiff opposition from some businesses owners and residents concerned about property rights.

"There's not enough pressure, there's not enough support, there's not enough movement by citizens themselves," Mr. Winegrad said.

Al Johnston, a dedicated civic activist from Severna Park who keeps a close eye on the County Council, encouraged others to join him in his efforts. He said the county's new growth and zoning plan will be issued in December, and that's an opportunity to make sure new development doesn't overwhelm the environment.

"I would like to be more than a committee of one fighting for what we're talking about tonight," he said.

The Severn River Association plans to post several slideshows from the State of the Severn River presenters at Severn River Association this week.

----now use the Web site if ya live in AACO---Meetings this week ---

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Second story Coming -Gotta copy & Paste it with an Edit---geo.

Second storyfor 3 million oysters in Severn

Colleen Dugan - The Capital
Stephanie Reynolds of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation explains how an artificial reef was created in the Severn River near Asquith Creek. In her hand, she holds an oyster shell covered with baby oysters that will be planted on the reef.

VIDEO
Severn River Oyster Planting
After concrete from the Bay Bridge was placed in the bottom of the Severn River this summer, millions of baby oysters were planted on top to create an artificial oyster reef on Thursday, October 23, 2008.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ADVERTISEMENT

Annapolis
RivaBy PAMELA WOOD, Staff Writer
Published October 24, 2008
Concrete that just a few months ago was on the Bay Bridge now is deep under water and covered with 3 million baby oysters.
In a unique partnership, contractors working on redecking the westbound span of the bridge didn't haul off the old concrete to the landfill. Instead, the state paid to have the concrete busted into smaller pieces, cleaned and carried on a barge to the Severn River.

The concrete chunks form the base for the river's newest oyster reef, a 3-acre spot near Asquith Creek.

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Patricia Campbell criss-crossed back and forth over the reef site yesterday, spewing shells covered in oyster "spat" into the water from a rotating device on the stern.

The goal is to boost the flagging population of native oysters, which have been decimated by past overharvesting, disease and poor water quality.

Yesterday's planting represented months of work and cooperation from scores of agencies and groups - including an unlikely alliance between transportation officials andenvironmental officials, not to mention fishermen and activists. Representatives from the various groups ceremoniously tossed a few chunks of concrete and a handful of oysters in the river to celebrate.

Eric Schwaab, the state's deputy secretary of natural resources, said the cooperation is heartening.

"I think it represents what we're going to need to turn the corner on bay restoration," he said, as the Patricia Campbell crew prepared to get to work.

Not only was it unusual to use old Bay Bridge concrete for oyster restoration, but the project also involved the creation of a brand-new reef - most oyster plantings are on existing or historic reefs.

The site was selected because it has good oxygen levels, and abundant underwater grasses that calm the waves and prevent sediment from smothering the oysters. The river has little to no evidence of the oyster-killing diseases Dermo and MSX, and the reef is off-limits to harvesting.

Officials also carefully plotted where to put the concrete and oysters, so as not to disturb boaters. There is at least 10 feet of clearance over the reefs for boaters.

Officials took an abundance of caution in planning this reef after a similar project in the Magothy River's Sillery Bay was botched last year. In that case, the base material was contaminated with trash that washed ashore. And it was put in the wrong spot, creating a navigational hazard.

The state has turned to artificial surfaces like rubble and bridge decking as a base for oysters because they have little else to work with to create the hard bottom that oysters like. Old oyster shell was used in the past, but the permit to dredge fossilized shell from the Upper Bay was not renewed.

For Bay Bridge officials, using the old concrete for oyster reefs was a nice way to help the environment.

"We saw it as a benefit to the environment and to the state," said Dennis Simpson, director of capital planning for the Maryland Transportation Authority, which oversees the bridge and other toll facilities.

Normally, the contractor doing the bridge redecking would have had to pay to send the concrete to a rubble landfill.

All told, 2,500 cubic yards of Bay Bridge concrete was used for the project - which represents 72 sections, or 1,462 feet, worth of bridge decking.

Other agencies and groups that were involved in the project, include: the Oyster Recovery Partnership, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the Maryland Legislative Sportsmen's Foundation, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Restore America's Estuaries, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Fred Kelly, the Severn Riverkeeper, was pleased to see the oysters go in the water.

"The oyster reef is terrific for the Severn River and it could do quite well," he said.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Refresh we killing me --had to do it this way--

---Forgive Me--As the other Water Quality Post was only opened a few times in comparison to trolling posts in the thousand Plus , it leads me to believe some Don't care as much as they Proffes to , about Water Quality ---Below are two Front Page Stories by Pamala Wood --First story --Wednesday --Second Story Friday --Please Devour the Words Carefully ---

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
waterway consistently bad
By PAMELA WOOD, Staff Writer
Published October 22, 2008
Like the Chesapeake Bay as a whole, the Severn River suffers from dirty runoff from paved surfaces, a loss of beneficial trees and a suffocating lack of oxygen in the water.

That was the conclusion of several experts who delivered the "State of the Severn River" to more than 60 Advocates gathered in Annapolis last night for a meeting of the Severn River Association.

"The state of the Severn River is similar to the states of the other rivers … It's in dismal shape," said Gerald Winegrad, a University of Maryland professor and former state senator.

Earlier this year, a University of Maryland report card gave Anne Arundel's rivers, including the Severn, a grade of "D-".

Monitoring by volunteers and staffers of the Severn Riverkeeper Program has documented a persistent summertime "dead zone" in the deeper waters of the Round Bay section of the river. In that area, oxygen levels in the water are so low that fish, crabs and other animals can't live there.

"There's a fairly consistent picture," said Dr. Pierre Henkart, a Volunteer who has led the monitoring for the past three summers.

Dead zones are caused when too many nutrients flow into the river, spurring the growth of algae blooms that ultimately suck life-sustaining oxygen from the water. Underwater grasses also suffer when algae blocks sunlight and when they are smothered by sediment and dirt that runs into the river during rainstorms.

If there's good news, it's that bacteria problems that endanger swimmers have lessened somewhat, reported Dr. Sally Hornor of Anne Arundel Community College, who runs the Operation Clearwater testing program.

Part of that is due to homeowners doing a better job picking up pet waste and not feeding geese and ducks, who leave waste on beaches.

But part of that also is due to a lack of rain, so less waste and bacteria is washing into the water.

And Dr. Kurt Riegel of Arnold, president of the river association, said there seems to be increasing interest in helping the river, though people may not know what to do or have a deep commitment.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

RIVER AT A GLANCE
Watershed:
The area draining into the river is 81 square miles. About 85 percent of the watershed is land and 15 percent is water, including streams, creeks and the river itself. About 110,000 people live in the watershed.

Challenges:
Loss of trees, increase of paved 'impervious' surfaces, declining water quality, degraded shoreline, wave action from heavy boat traffic and not much public access to the river.

What the river needs:
Retrofit areas that lack adequate ways for stormwater to soak into the ground; decrease of pollution by individual residents; not allow loss of forests or increase in pollution from new developments; better enforcement of existing pollution and zoning laws; replace failing septic systems with nitrogen-reducing systems; and more awareness of issues by residents and elected officials.

Source: Severn River Association

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Public awareness due to groups like this and people like you is increasing," he said.

The advocates weren't deterred by the challenges, however. After the presentations were over, they peppered the speakers with questions about how they can make a difference.

Mr. Winegrad said it's up to those who already care about the river to get others engaged. And more people need to lobby elected officials to pass tougher pollution laws and better enforce the ones already on the books, he said.

"The answer lies right within all the folks here," he said.

He pointed out that efforts to toughen Critical Area laws, which restrict shoreline construction, and to levy a tax to pay for stormwater fixes faced stiff opposition from some businesses owners and residents concerned about property rights.

"There's not enough pressure, there's not enough support, there's not enough movement by citizens themselves," Mr. Winegrad said.

Al Johnston, a dedicated civic activist from Severna Park who keeps a close eye on the County Council, encouraged others to join him in his efforts. He said the county's new growth and zoning plan will be issued in December, and that's an opportunity to make sure new development doesn't overwhelm the enviroment

Colleen Dugan - The Capital
Stephanie Reynolds of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation explains how an artificial reef was created in the Severn River near Asquith Creek. In her hand, she holds an oyster shell covered with baby oysters that will be planted on the reef.

VIDEO
Severn River Oyster Planting
After concrete from the Bay Bridge was placed in the bottom of the Severn River this summer, millions of baby oysters were planted on top to create an artificial oyster reef on Thursday, October 23, 2008.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Annapolis
RivaBy PAMELA WOOD, Staff Writer
Published October 24, 2008
Concrete that just a few months ago was on the Bay Bridge now is deep under water and covered with 3 million baby oysters.
In a unique partnership, contractors working on redecking the westbound span of the bridge didn't haul off the old concrete to the landfill. Instead, the state paid to have the concrete busted into smaller pieces, cleaned and carried on a barge to the Severn River.

The concrete chunks form the base for the river's newest oyster reef, a 3-acre spot near Asquith Creek.

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Patricia Campbell criss-crossed back and forth over the reef site yesterday, spewing shells covered in oyster "spat" into the water from a rotating device on the stern.

The goal is to boost the flagging population of native oysters, which have been decimated by past overharvesting, disease and poor water quality.

Yesterday's planting represented months of work and cooperation from scores of agencies and groups - including an unlikely alliance between transportation officials andenvironmental officials, not to mention fishermen and activists. Representatives from the various groups ceremoniously tossed a few chunks of concrete and a handful of oysters in the river to celebrate.

Eric Schwaab, the state's deputy secretary of natural resources, said the cooperation is heartening.

"I think it represents what we're going to need to turn the corner on bay restoration," he said, as the Patricia Campbell crew prepared to get to work.

Not only was it unusual to use old Bay Bridge concrete for oyster restoration, but the project also involved the creation of a brand-new reef - most oyster plantings are on existing or historic reefs.

The site was selected because it has good oxygen levels, and abundant underwater grasses that calm the waves and prevent sediment from smothering the oysters. The river has little to no evidence of the oyster-killing diseases Dermo and MSX, and the reef is off-limits to harvesting.

Officials also carefully plotted where to put the concrete and oysters, so as not to disturb boaters. There is at least 10 feet of clearance over the reefs for boaters.

Officials took an abundance of caution in planning this reef after a similar project in the Magothy River's Sillery Bay was botched last year. In that case, the base material was contaminated with trash that washed ashore. And it was put in the wrong spot, creating a navigational hazard.

The state has turned to artificial surfaces like rubble and bridge decking as a base for oysters because they have little else to work with to create the hard bottom that oysters like. Old oyster shell was used in the past, but the permit to dredge fossilized shell from the Upper Bay was not renewed.

For Bay Bridge officials, using the old concrete for oyster reefs was a nice way to help the environment.

"We saw it as a benefit to the environment and to the state," said Dennis Simpson, director of capital planning for the Maryland Transportation Authority, which oversees the bridge and other toll facilities.

Normally, the contractor doing the bridge redecking would have had to pay to send the concrete to a rubble landfill.

All told, 2,500 cubic yards of Bay Bridge concrete was used for the project - which represents 72 sections, or 1,462 feet, worth of bridge decking.

Other agencies and groups that were involved in the project, include: the Oyster Recovery Partnership, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the Maryland Legislative Sportsmen's Foundation, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Restore America's Estuaries, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Fred Kelly, the Severn Riverkeeper, was pleased to see the oysters go in the water.

"The oyster reef is terrific for the Severn River and it could do quite well," he said.

"I would like to be more than a committee of one fighting for what we're talking about tonight," he said.

The Severn River Association plans to post several slideshows from the State of the Severn River presenters at Severn River Association this week.

----now use the Web site if ya live in AACO---Meetings this week ---

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Second story Coming -Gotta copy & Paste it with an Edit---geo.

Second storyfor 3 million oysters in Severn

--Here Goes been wiped out Twice by refresh

for 3 million oysters in Severn

Colleen Dugan - The Capital
Stephanie Reynolds of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation explains how an artificial reef was created in the Severn River near Asquith Creek. In her hand, she holds an oyster shell covered with baby oysters that will be planted on the reef.

VIDEO
Severn River Oyster Planting
After concrete from the Bay Bridge was placed in the bottom of the Severn River this summer, millions of baby oysters were planted on top to create an artificial oyster reef on Thursday, October 23, 2008.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
for 3 million oysters in Severn

Colleen Dugan - The Capital
Stephanie Reynolds of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation explains how an artificial reef was created in the Severn River near Asquith Creek. In her hand, she holds an oyster shell covered with baby oysters that will be planted on the reef.

VIDEO
Severn River Oyster Planting
After concrete from the Bay Bridge was placed in the bottom of the Severn River this summer, millions of baby oysters were planted on top to create an artificial oyster reef on Thursday, October 23, 2008.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ADVERTISEMENT

Annapolis
RivaBy PAMELA WOOD, Staff Writer
Published October 24, 2008
Concrete that just a few months ago was on the Bay Bridge now is deep under water and covered with 3 million baby oysters.
In a unique partnership, contractors working on redecking the westbound span of the bridge didn't haul off the old concrete to the landfill. Instead, the state paid to have the concrete busted into smaller pieces, cleaned and carried on a barge to the Severn River.

The concrete chunks form the base for the river's newest oyster reef, a 3-acre spot near Asquith Creek.

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Patricia Campbell criss-crossed back and forth over the reef site yesterday, spewing shells covered in oyster "spat" into the water from a rotating device on the stern.

The goal is to boost the flagging population of native oysters, which have been decimated by past overharvesting, disease and poor water quality.

Yesterday's planting represented months of work and cooperation from scores of agencies and groups - including an unlikely alliance between transportation officials andenvironmental officials, not to mention fishermen and activists. Representatives from the various groups ceremoniously tossed a few chunks of concrete and a handful of oysters in the river to celebrate.

Eric Schwaab, the state's deputy secretary of natural resources, said the cooperation is heartening.

"I think it represents what we're going to need to turn the corner on bay restoration," he said, as the Patricia Campbell crew prepared to get to work.

Not only was it unusual to use old Bay Bridge concrete for oyster restoration, but the project also involved the creation of a brand-new reef - most oyster plantings are on existing or historic reefs.

The site was selected because it has good oxygen levels, and abundant underwater grasses that calm the waves and prevent sediment from smothering the oysters. The river has little to no evidence of the oyster-killing diseases Dermo and MSX, and the reef is off-limits to harvesting.

Officials also carefully plotted where to put the concrete and oysters, so as not to disturb boaters. There is at least 10 feet of clearance over the reefs for boaters.

Officials took an abundance of caution in planning this reef after a similar project in the Magothy River's Sillery Bay was botched last year. In that case, the base material was contaminated with trash that washed ashore. And it was put in the wrong spot, creating a navigational hazard.

The state has turned to artificial surfaces like rubble and bridge decking as a base for oysters because they have little else to work with to create the hard bottom that oysters like. Old oyster shell was used in the past, but the permit to dredge fossilized shell from the Upper Bay was not renewed.

For Bay Bridge officials, using the old concrete for oyster reefs was a nice way to help the environment.

"We saw it as a benefit to the environment and to the state," said Dennis Simpson, director of capital planning for the Maryland Transportation Authority, which oversees the bridge and other toll facilities.

Normally, the contractor doing the bridge redecking would have had to pay to send the concrete to a rubble landfill.

All told, 2,500 cubic yards of Bay Bridge concrete was used for the project - which represents 72 sections, or 1,462 feet, worth of bridge decking.

Other agencies and groups that were involved in the project, include: the Oyster Recovery Partnership, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the Maryland Legislative Sportsmen's Foundation, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Restore America's Estuaries, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Fred Kelly, the Severn Riverkeeper, was pleased to see the oysters go in the water.

"The oyster reef is terrific for the Severn River and it could do quite well," he said.

--Hope some of AACO Water Quality people Support Sewers as better Solution than Upgrades--geo.
 

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Good post Capt.George.....hope more people pay ATTENTION !

The bay has lots of problems and it's going to take a concerted effort from all parties to begin to unravel the mess......
Don't be fooled, it's a POLITICAL process......hold our elected representatives accountable.....contact your local, state and federal representatives...and let them know they need to put their money where their mouth is.......they CAN be voted out !!!

We've had many years of lip service with little real progress.....maybe this is the beginning of a turn-around.

Oysters are a key.....more oysters=more filtering of sediment and nutrients.
More filtering=cleaner water.
Cleaner water=more grasses and aquatic plants.
More grasses and aquatic plants=more habitat for other aquatic species.....
The whole process builds upon itself.
 

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Thanks for the post Capt. George:thumbup: This is the kind of projects we NEED!!! s anyone hear familiar with the Growing Oysters in Buckets at the pier Program??? I'd be interested! Thanks!


Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It took me over an hr. to make this Post --Refresh kills Edits--geo.
 

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I just wanted to add: Fished out of Solomons last Wedsday and had water visability to 7 FEET. Fished above Pools Island last night and had 3-4' visability. It's the middle that is depressingly FILTHY!!!:eek: The area between Pataspco and Severn. Something needs to be done.......and quick. I wont know what two tell my 2 1/2 year old daughter when in a few years, she asks me why our river looks like the color of a TURD!!!


Bill
 

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capt.george - Excellent articles, especially concerning the building of the oyster reef near Asquith Creek. IMHO, reestablishing oysters by the millions+ in the Severn (and in other rivers) may do more to improve water quality and clarity than additional pollution abatement... probably a lot cheaper too.

QUESTION: I know the Asquith has been declared off-limits to oyster harvest. Just wondering though. Are oysters established on concrete rubble pretty much immune to harvesting anyway???, especially tong harvesting??? I'd think trying to wrestle up a big chunk of concrete covered with oysters would be dang near impossible.

About the refreshing issue on TF: Do yourself a HUGE favor when composing long posts/replies by writing them off-line in "Word" then cut&paste them into TidalFish (like I'm doing right now). Its EXTREMELY easy, I've been doing this for years on TF and other sites too. If you don't know how to cut&paste from "Word" into TidalFish (or from any other word processing program) then ask your kids, grand kids or great grand kids how its done.
 

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I dove the Severn reef just a week after it was put in.saw crabs/Spot ans small Eels.The guys topside caught small Rock/White Perch and even a tiny Croaker :yes:.

With the oysters being put on the reef-in a few years it should be a great spot to fish :thumbup:.

I can not go into all the details just yet but one huge problem in the bay bridge area is the sewage outflow pipes :eek:.Let's just say that diving them has opened my eyes to something very wrong.

The Severn is hurt by all the old septic systems.When a house sits 50 feet above the water- where do you think the sewage goes ? It travels the path of leasr resistance.Those wet spots on the cliffs aren't spring water.
 

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Capt George excellent post wish our elected officials took a genuine interest in the health of the bay instead of saying how much they care. Would be helpful if they published on a regular basis things people can do to help the health of the bay.
 

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Capt. George,

Excellent post.

I have been noticing some changes in my frequent fishing trips to #1. Two years ago I was pulling up the occassional oyster shell with nothing attached to it. This year I pull up an occassional oyster shell there are usually three to four smaller oysters attached to the shell. Is this a coincidence, or is the water actually getting better? It sounds like efforts such as the ones you are talking about in your post are having an effect.

My only wish is the folks will listen and start to do what your articles recommend, pick up the dog droppings, do not feed geese, and cut back on the fertilizers being put on the lawns. This is going to take a long time to take effect, but it will help us all in the long run.

I am also hoping some of those baby croaker hanging around #1 this year show up next year as 13 and 14 inch croaker.

Brandon's tip of the week. When composing replies to messages, use the Go Advanced option. The refresh does not affect it.
 

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Excellent post, Capt.:thumbup: Al Johnston, who was quoted in the first article, is super-human. He's extremely intelligent, very articulate, very dedicated, and well into his 80s. He knows that he won't live to see most of the changes that he fights for; he's doing it for all of us. The best way to honor people like him (and the Capt. George's of this world) is to pick up the fight and continue pushing hard. Write to your council members, state senators...whatever it takes. Don't let them forget this issue....not for a moment. And don't let your neighbors forget it, either.
 

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Blaming high bacteria levels on just pet waste and goose **** is silly. When was the last time Anne Arundel County inspected existing shoreline septic systems? Ever? I bet one overflowing sewage system puts more bacteria in the river than every sh*ting dog in Annapolis. I also bet there are hundreds if not thousands that need repair. Show me a politician who is willing to take that on, and I'll show you one who'll be out of a job in the next election. Talk is just talk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
capt.george - Excellent articles, especially concerning the building of the oyster reef near Asquith Creek. IMHO, reestablishing oysters by the millions+ in the Severn (and in other rivers) may do more to improve water quality and clarity than additional pollution abatement... probably a lot cheaper too.

QUESTION: I know the Asquith has been declared off-limits to oyster harvest. Just wondering though. Are oysters established on concrete rubble pretty much immune to harvesting anyway???, especially tong harvesting??? I'd think trying to wrestle up a big chunk of concrete covered with oysters would be dang near impossible.

About the refreshing issue on TF: Do yourself a HUGE favor when composing long posts/replies by writing them off-line in "Word" then cut&paste them into TidalFish (like I'm doing right now). Its EXTREMELY easy, I've been doing this for years on TF and other sites too. If you don't know how to cut&paste from "Word" into TidalFish (or from any other word processing program) then ask your kids, grand kids or great grand kids how its done.
=----==Thank you oh so very Much --I can Do that ---Your very Kind --geo. P.S. I'm also still on dial Up --Changing next week , Then I Can hear the Song On My Web site--
 

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Concrete rubble is best oystered by divers.The reef inside Bloody Point is a favorite one :yes:.
 

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capt.george - I have dial-up too. Went I'm on-line then the phone does not work. So I need to make my time online as short as posible, so I composed off-line. Cable or other alternatives are still many miles away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Excellent post, Capt.:thumbup: Al Johnston, who was quoted in the first article, is super-human. He's extremely intelligent, very articulate, very dedicated, and well into his 80s. He knows that he won't live to see most of the changes that he fights for; he's doing it for all of us. The best way to honor people like him (and the Capt. George's of this world) is to pick up the fight and continue pushing hard. Write to your council members, state senators...whatever it takes. Don't let them forget this issue....not for a moment. And don't let your neighbors forget it, either.
--Thanks for the Intrest in This --I was trying for a CCA alert with all the names & Numbers ---As A CCA member ( Joined Only On the Basis , Ya Can't Change Someting if ya don't Belong ---)--As I felt they were Pioneers in the Water Quality Fight , I'd Hoped they would Provide info --

--Former Sen. Weingard, & Va. Claggett Know me well from Fisheries Issues , ( lost Post) wii be back --Damm forgot to use Word --Senior moment ---
 

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capt.george - I have dial-up too. Went I'm on-line then the phone does not work. So I need to make my time online as short as posible, so I composed off-line. Cable or other alternatives are still many miles away.
--Put your Dial up phone on Call forwarding to your Cell ---Use em Both --
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Concrete rubble is best oystered by divers.The reef inside Bloody Point is a favorite one :yes:.
--Holligan Snooze reef?---Aint that Tires with Concrate --
 

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Septic Systems

I recall fishing Gingerville creek off the South River in the 70,s and was shocked at the number of waterfront homes that had garden hoses running down to the water to get rid of laundry water rather than have it go into their septic system. The ones that had the most to loose were the ones polluting the worst. Appartently this was a common practice at the time.
 

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Blaming high bacteria levels on just pet waste and goose **** is silly. When was the last time Anne Arundel County inspected existing shoreline septic systems? Ever? I bet one overflowing sewage system puts more bacteria in the river than every sh*ting dog in Annapolis. I also bet there are hundreds if not thousands that need repair. Show me a politician who is willing to take that on, and I'll show you one who'll be out of a job in the next election. Talk is just talk.
Shawn, this was a major bone of contention when MDE recently completed its Severn TMDL report for the EPA. To be sure, pet and esp. waterfoul waste DO have local impacts. But the person who tests the Severn, along with other smart folks, believe that this it is being made the scapegoat so that MDE has an excuse for not complying with the Clean Water Act. Obviously, MD will not meet the 2010 CWA standards under the EPA consent decree. Blaming the problem on nature is its best hope for MD to avoid sanctions, I guess. When you think about it, if MD waterways are already severely impaired, then MD should not be able to allow one ounce of additional impervious surface in those watersheds....not one more bit of pollution. That, of course, would not please some industries and their slavish followers in government.
 
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