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Got out yesterday morning on the Severn and enjoyed a short run of catching some pickeral. Two of us managed 6 pickeral and 1 white perch. Three of the pickeral were about 14 inches and 3 were between 20 and 21 inches. We did a little exploring after the bite stopped and entered two ponds that were loaded with young jellyfish. There were thousands of them between 1/2 inch and 2 inches in diameter. These 2 ponds produced no bites and no signs of fish. Both were closer to the mouth of the Severn than the area of the river that produced. Would anyone know if pickeral and jellyfish live in completely different areas which is why there were no signs of pickeral or perch where these young jellyfish were present? Is it a salinity thing? The water temp was roughly the same at all locations.

I only get out to the river about 3 to 4 times a year so I live vicariously through the rest of your fishing reports. I love reading your reports and enjoy and viewing the pictures so keep them coming.
 

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As a general rule, most jellyfish prefer higher salinity. That is why we don't usually find the common bay jellyfish (sea nettle) showing up in local waters until July, after salinity has crept up. Conversely, pickerel are freshwater fish that can tolerate limited estuarine salinity levels. The salinity tolerance of the two groups of animals would most likely keep them separated.

There is another "jellyfish-like" animal that occurs in local waters for a long period of time each year. Although it looks like a jellyfish without tentacles, it is an entirely different group of animals known as ctenophores, sea walnuts, or comb jellies. There are roughly the size of a golf ball but are elongated. I don't know the salinity tolerance of ctenphores, but suspect it is broader than the bay jellyfish. This may be what you saw.
 

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The only jellyfish that I've heard of locally in large numbers during the winter are the orange-kind. Were these orange? I've never heard of them concentrated in ponds, though. Strange (and kind of neat).

Like John said, aside from the fact that their stinging might be an annoyance to any Pickerel in those ponds, that could be a sign of higher salinity, which Pickerel generally do not like. However, with all of the rain that we've received, I doubt that anywhere in the Severn watershed has salinity beyond a Pickerel's tolerance right now.
 

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Nice work Chumlee. :thumbup:

I live vicariously through the rest of your fishing reports
I do the same thing. Even though I fish this river a great deal, these guys still impress me with what they come up with. And you're correct, there is a great deal of knowledge in this club that I can't get enough of.
 
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