Tidal Fish Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,687 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'VE BOUGHT INTO A LEASE ON A 200AC TRACT. A 1/3 OF IT WAS LOGGED LAST YEAR. THERE ARE SKIDDER TRACKS/RUTS AND LEFT OVER LOGS MIXED ALL AROUND THE CLEARED AREA. HOWEVER, I PLAN ON HAND BROADCASTING A FEW CHOICE LOCATIONS. I THINK I'M GONNA USE A BRAND CALLED ANTLER KING. ACCORDING TO THE RESEARCH IT GROWS IN A WIDE VARIETY OF SOIL PH'S AND CAN BE PLANTED BETWEEN AUG AND OCT (FALL VARIERTY). I WAS WODERING IF ANY FARMERS/HUNTERS DOWN THAT WAY HAVE ANY TIPS/POINTERS ABOUT HE SOIL DOWN THAT WAY. THE LEASE IS JUST OFF RT13 SOUTH ABOUT 20MINS FROM RT50. THANKS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Logged last year, and there is nothing growing? Was the logging pines? My guess is the Ph will be high, even if the plant mix says it can grow in diffrent phs, It will most likly respond better to more neutral soil.. Good news.... lime is very cheap. Let me take a look at this product. I'll get back to you, if I find out anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
730 Posts
I imagine it is pretty acidic (a little above 5 I would guess) down there but your best bet is to call the USDA-Natural Resource Conservation Service for the county. Those guys are the experts. Worcester County I am assuming.

mike

http://www.sawgal.umd.edu/nrcsweb/Maryland/Worcester/Contents.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,687 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
THANKS GUYS, I'VE ASLO FOUND SEVERAL VARIETY'S THAT GROW BEST IN A 6-7PH RANGE. I'D LOVE TO SEE THAT GOOD A PH DOWN THERE BUT HIHGLY DOUBT IT, USUALLY IN MY EXPR IT SEEMS MOST AREAS PINES GROW IN ARE ACIDIC. YA IT WAS PINES, BUT THE GOOD NEWS IS THEY LEFT TWO WHITE OAKS STANDING IN THE CLEAR CUT AND I GOT BY STAND IN ONE AND MY BUDDY IS IN THE OTHER ABOUT 200YDS AWAY[grin] WE GOT THE ENTIRE BACK CORNER BLOCKED OFF, WHICH GETS SOUTHERN EXPOSURE AND THAT'S WERE I WANT TO PLANT. I HAVE NO PROBLEM FERTILIZING (LIME) IF NEED BE. I'LL CHECK WITH THE COUNTY/FED TOO. RICH CALL ME. THANKS GUYS!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
693 Posts
You can almost always say you need lime especially on the shore and in the woods (or once was woods as the ground would have been covered with decaying leaf litter and pine needles).

On the lower shore.....more of a problem would be moisture in a very sandy soil, like right now.

Clovers are very slow growers and have shallow roots.

The other lower shore food plot problem.....WEEDS, the lower shore has some terrible weeds.

Lastly, on the lower shore....no need to fool around with different food plot mixes.....only one needed...SOYBEANS.....my farmed fields are being crippled.

Mark
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top