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Ok Guys, when is too much preventive maintenance? My Merc 150 outboard just turned 5 years old.. The previous owner kept her in the water and when I look at the trim/tilt motor doesn't look good. Its still works, but it seems (at least in cold weather) to make more noise now. Should I replace it now? Is 5 years about average?

I am also looking at replacing all my hoses, at least the fuel ones.. I would rather spend more now, than be waiting next summer to get things fixed?

What do you think, I am off my rocker?

Thanks, Ken

The reason why I am asking is my water pump is acking up, gets hot when I go slow...(and my dealership said we can't get to it until DEC)
[sad][sad]
 

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IMHO, within reason you can't do to much "planned maintenance" and it sure beats the alternative of not doing enough and being stranded on the water.

Since your talking about a used rig, I would say do whatever you think is necessary initially to make you comfortable. After that just follow the manufacture's recommendations.
 

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I got a 13 y.o. boat and the fuel lines were dry rotting big time, so I replaced them all. (fill lines, vent lines, and supply lines) Not a big deal. However, at this point its been 3 years since I did that, and the hoses are beginning to show wear where they are exposed betw the transom and the engine, so at least the portion of fuel line from my fuel/water separator to the engine will be replaced every 5 years.

Also, I found that 10-13 years is the limit of structural integrity of vinyl thru-hulls. Replaced all of them, as well as scuppers.

Also, things such as hydraulic cylinder seals may start wearing at 5 years.

Bilge pumps (or pump switches if external) should be replaced every 5 years.

The list could go on for preventative maintainence. But you prioritize and suffer consequences. Fuel line or thru-hull failure can be catestrophic. Bilge pump failure can also be if your thru-hull fails. Cylinder seals will be a slow gradual failure. BUT, if you ignore your steering cylinder until you have a seal failure, your cylinder arms will fuse to the engine bracket and you'll never be able to replace the seals when they do fail.

So in other words, do it all or suffer in the long run.
 
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