Tidal Fish Forum banner

1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a trailer for my 17' Carolina Skiff and I was intending on hauling my boat to the Concrete ships and Hot Ditch during the winter. Im 16 and have only been driving for a year. My dad and I agree that I am fully capable of driving the trailer but my mom does not agree. She thinks I am too unexpierienced as a driver to pull the trailer.

Since you all are the expierienced with trailers, what do you think?
(My mom says if more than half the people that post agree with me she might consider letting me drive it.)

Thanks,
Cashin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
You will never learn and get used to it until you go and do it! I think you will be ok. I say pull the trailer and get fishing! :rockon:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
The thing you need to master is backing it up and launching and recovering your boat, going ahead is the easy part. It wouldn't be a bad idea to understand how the lights work on it and how to change a tire, before venturing to far from home. Go for it you'll get used to it quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Drive the trailer. Show her you can park the trailer in the driveway. Show her you can park it at night as well. You're not going to get good at it unless you do it. I rented the jonboats from the base at MWR when I was 16 and 17. I was inexperienced and if I couldn't put the trailer where I wanted it, then I would look at a different spot to launch or park it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
DO IT!!!!! like said earlier going forward is easy,, remember the trailer follows the shortest path on curves.. probably won't matter much with your trailer, don't Panic,, take your time backing up, probably would avoid crowds at first at boat ramps, good luck, Phil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
Pull the trailer around the neighborhood a few times for practice. Then take it to an empty parking lot and practice backing the boat up into a parking space. After you gain some experience you should be ready to go.

The key is a properly maintained trailer, a spare tire and the tools needed to change the tire and approval from Mom (most important)!

Gain some "close to home" experience with Mom or Dad in the truck with you, and after 2 or 3 trips Mom AND you will have the confidence needed to pull a boat trailer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
I agree with the empty parking lot for practice...and orange cones....set up as many situations as you can.....drive it first without the boat a bit if you can
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,887 Posts
Cashin - take it up to the grocery store parking lot at night. Set up some cones.. whatever.. and practice backing it in... making turns/corners. Do it with/without the boat.

Mom has the same fear as when you started driving the car a year ago... no experience then either. I always used, "Mom, you've done a great job raising me. Be confident in the job you've done and let me assume the responsibility". LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,065 Posts
Never mind what we say.....have her go along on a trip from home- to owls creek.....back the trailor down the ramp 5 times.....circle around the block and back to the ramp......back the trailor down the ramp 5 more times......now take here home......she is convinced.......if that dont work you have my YES vote.

Dont forget your TURN SIGNALS & dont cut the CORNERS too sharp

For what its worth I was driving on the road when I was 14 on a big old piece of **** John Deer tractor pulling 3 hay wagons 9 miles down an interstate.....back then you didnt even need a license to drive farm equipment on the paved roads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
That's great advice to take Mom along! One thing I would add is to establish a routine when hooking/unhooking the trailer to your car/truck and loading/unloading your boat. Show Mom you are serious by writing out a step by step list and safety checks...then commit it to memory. After a few times you'll get it down to a science and will be better able to react to the inevitable bad ramp experience. "Stuff" happens to everyone and knowing your routine helps keep your wits when things don't work out as planned.

Good luck and you have my vote.

CC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,884 Posts
My vote is yes, but my words of warning in addition to others mentioned;

1) If the winds pick up on the CBBT be extra cautious. They can sway a trailer fast.

2) Watch when big rigs go by you. They have a vacuum as they go by and can pull your trailer side to side.

3) Don't do anything stupid(passing on CBBT, speeding to get home faster, no ETOH you will learn about that in Chemistry and DUI)

Have fun and catch one for me!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Martin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
846 Posts
Ditto Racn, Practice with her a few times just like you did when you had your learners permit. I grew up in Lynchburg. I bought a second hand truck with paper route money I had saved over the years. My brother and I used to fill the bed up with pretty girls, hook the boat up and go skiing in the fall and spring. Piece of cake. Have fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,685 Posts
If you do what has been said you will have no problems with handleing the trailer. Be patient, think things out, and before you go learn what to do in an emergency of any sort. And stay away from the second ship starboard side in the south row of ships, thats my tog hole and dont clean it out:)):))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
if your parents trust you enough to go out on the water by yourself then they should certainly belive you are capable of trailering a boat that size, with very little practice of course. At that age I wasn't even allowed to have keys to the house much less the cars or boats!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,552 Posts
Awww... come on mom, take a chill pill...hes a big boy...have him haul it up to the Wal Mart parking lot and you drive around with him for a while...in no time at all he'll be good to go...he wont be if you dont let him...beside... that's what insurance is for...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
I drive a tractor trailer and also pull my 29' cruiser best thing is to just take it slow until you get the hang of it, there is substitute for experience and you will not get experience unless you pull,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
above all........do not forget......even for a minute, even when going down the highway going forward
that you have that trailer behind you..............................................
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
If you don't know ramp etiquette, learn it quick.
Watch experienced boaters launch and haul out their boat. It's obvious who has a system down and who doesn't.
There is a lot to be said about making the process fast and safe so the people behind you are not stuck in line.

Do small things like remove your straps, secure your tackle, load the boat and other small tasks before you begin the process of backing it down the ramp. Once in the water, move your boat as far back as possible so the next guy can get launched.

When pulling your boat out of the water, pull to place that is out of the way to secure the straps and get the boat ready to trailer. Don't do it where you could cause a road block or traffic jam.

Be courteous but be safe.

I trailer a 26' CC and I have a system down that allows me to launch and get out of peoples way so they are not waiting on me. I can have my boat hauled and secured by the time the average boater gets their boat to the bow stop.. I am always aware who is around me so that I don't slow anyone down. I do it safe but fast. The ramp can be a very miserable place on a busy day and most of it is due to lack of knowledge and common courtesy.

Spend some time at Owls Creek or Crab Creek on a Saturday and watch. You'll see the good and bad of trailering a boat.
It could be a valuable lesson that I wish was taught somewhere.

Good luck and be safe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,953 Posts
While all the comments are appropriate, you should be aware that driving thru the tunnel pulling a trailer is going to be an uncomforable experience. I have been driving for over fifty years, and still, when I trailer my boat thru the HRBT, it gives me concern that the lanes are very narrow and the sides very close. Please take it at a speed slightly below the traffic around you and carefully watch the trailer in both sideview mirrows of your car or trunk.
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top