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Stop signs are red.
When water is muddy you use red lures.
The longest wave length in the light spectrum is red.

Why do people insist that red fishing line disappears under water?

Do you think if you are under water looking up would not the red line stand out say more than clear mono??

Capt Mike
 

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Light is absorbed by water according to wavelength with the longer wave radiation (red) absorbed first. No red light, no red color to see. Maximum transmission is for short wavelengths of light (blue).
 

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you are correct, Capt Mike.

any object can be seen if you are under it looking up.
the red line & red hooks are marketed because red is the first color you "loose" as you go deeper.
the light segments penetrate the water to different depths....with red being the first to go and violet being one of the last to disappear underwater.

remember your rainbow colors.....ROYGBIV....red, orange, yellow, green blue, indigo & violet?
that is the order in which the colors disappear as you go deeper. the longer the wavelength the less water it can penetrate.

the red hooks get me....they are marketed as "bleeding hooks", etc. but if red disappears first then you can't see them....right? that makes more "marketing sense" to me than bleeding.

kind of a head scratcher...isn't it?
 

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This is one reason I started to scuba dive-alot of questions that no one really could answer for me.

In our bay (near Annapolis) the underwater viz. is under 3'.At first the water is light green-down to about 10'.From 10-20' it gets dark green.Around 20' it gets dark-no more sunlight.At 30' it's really black.Most times on the bottom there is a black silty cloud-like a fog bank.

I use a very powerful dive light but it is only a "glow" at arms length.When I come across lures-chart. shows up first.With out a light though-it is hard to see anything.White lures sort of glow.

Farther down the bay (Solomons) the water is clearer but still it is dark by 35' or so.The colors do disappear like the charts tell us.With a light-red is red at 30'-take the light away and it does turn dark brown/black.

It amazes me when one color works better then others in our bay water given the viz.I guess the fish get used to seeing the baitfish colors and tune into certain shades/colors.I think the size/shape is more important then color most days.With little viz. it makes good sense to keep fresh bait so the fish can get close by smell.

I'll take a camera underwater this year in May/June and try to post some photos of lures at differant depths.Not sure how well it will show up with a flash in the silty water but worth a try. Skip
 

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Probably pointing out the obvious, but that's assuming fish see like humans. Prove that and I bet you win a six-pack from somebody!

"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." -Mark Twain
 

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I use a very powerful dive light but it is only a "glow" at arms length.When I come across lures-chart. shows up first. With out a light though-it is hard to see anything.White lures sort of glow. Skip
And they laugh at me for my fanatical use of Glow in Dark Bucktails with it's self contained light source :))
 

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Skip I see a problem with your experiment.

What ever light you use so the lure is visible on the film, you change what it really looks like because you are introducing a spectrum of light that is filtered out at that depth by the water.

I thought it was interesting to hear that at 30 feet in the upper bay it is dark. I must be the lateral lines on the fish and the vibration of the lure that attracts the fish and probably has little to do with color at all. Except we all know certain color lures work better than others some days. Now I have a head ache.:confused:
 

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Phil-give me a little credit:D .My plan is too use the camera flash-then my dive light -then normal light.I want to make a board with 3-4 colors of shads and photograph them at 10' intervals to 30'.Looking up (like rockfish) there is some light that may help them spot the lures.I'm thinking that Shawn has a valid point that fish eyes "see" differant then ours. Skip
 

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Partial Colorblindness

Also red is one of the most popular colors that people cannot see and are partially colorblind to. 4 out of 12 people cannot tell the ripe red of a tomato, its all the same shade to them "ripe or not."
 

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Shawn funny you should mention how a fish sees. Sports Fishing Magazine had an artical in the October 2006 issue dealing with the science of fish vision.
 

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Probably pointing out the obvious, but that's assuming fish see like humans. Prove that and I bet you win a six-pack from somebody!

i'm so glad you brought that up!
i have long suspected, but with no empirical way to prove it, that fish percieve color differently than we do. anyone have a good empirical test? we now know bees actually can see in the ultra-violet range, and some deep-dwelling fish percieve changes in infra-red.

i was watching some bluegill swimming around our dock in minnesota last year, and their tails were just as chartreuse as could be. 'splain that.

no, i really don't know what it all means, or why it works, but it does.

b
 

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A long time ago when I used to BASS fish, the pro's always said black lures were the best for bad visability, not sure why, but I have heard some people like black for the bay??? But that wouldn't make sense if its so dark down there, who knows.

Also because of work I happen to know about a study that says bright pink is the most obvious color a human can spot, for instance a man in the water for the study was seen the most and from greatest distances with bright pink on.

One may think it would be florecent orange or Chartruese, but pink it was.

That may explain why some people like pink lures in the bay, I know I'm going to try them this spring.
But then again, who knows how similar or dissimilar fish and humans vision is???
 

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I think the misconception is that the red line "disappears" first. It looses its color first, but by loosing its color it shows up as a dark shade of gray.

Skip indicated, there is a glow of light (like a fog) from above. The fish see the shadow/profile of the baitfish, more than they see the color. At night under the lights of a dock or a bridge, the best fishing is up in the top 2' of the water column with a black or really dark (e.g., rootbeer) colored bait. The fish apparently attack from beneath, seeing the black profile of the baitfish, not the color. That is why size and profile is generally more important than color. Match the hatch in size and profile, and you can catch these dumb fish with just about any color.
 

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Also because of work I happen to know about a study that says bright pink is the most obvious color a human can spot, for instance a man in the water for the study was seen the most and from greatest distances with bright pink on.
so what your saying is that they have to start making survival suits in bright pink, not orange:clap:

Mark.
 
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