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Looking at a 2002 28' Grady and 2002 28' Scout walkaround. Any opinions? Both have yamaha 2-strokes on them and all the bells and whistles. I really don't know much about Scout boats. Thanks!
 

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If you can afford the Grady- buy it.My wife and I spent almost 2 years shopping for a boat.Very quickly we realized why the better boats cost more.Albermarle,Carolina Classic,Fountain,Pursuit,Regulator and Grady were the ones we felt could hold up to heavy fishing.The cheaper models just are not built as well - IMHO.

Grady's have a great reputation and hold up well-if taken care of.I've seen some 30 year old Grady's out fishing on their 3rd set of engines :thumbup:.
 

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No question - the Grady. Check out the fit and finish on both boats, how they are laid out, equip. storage, rod storage, etc and I think you will be convinced. Oh - check out resale value...
 

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Scouts are nice boats but are not in the same league as Gradys. Years ago I ran a 17' Scout center console and enjoyed it a lot. But then I moved up to a 23' Parker (I know Skip, its not a Grady, but is still a well-made solid boat with top notch components ;-)) and immediately saw the difference. The Scout is lighter with no wood in the hull, but that may mean something in terms of how it rides and the longevity of the hull after repeated pounding.

In this area there are thousands of Gradys operating year after year but relatively few Scouts. I suspect the resale on the Gradys will be higher because of the local familiarity with the brand.
 

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I like Skip spent a long time looking. I looked at Scout, the 28 in particular, and the Scout seemed to not have the "toughnees" built in to a Grady. Mine is a '97 and has held up very well. It's had to endure some rough stuff in the past and Everything on the boat is still in place.
The Judge is a great boat as are the other boats mentioned. The problem is finding one used with what your looking for.
Is this a private sale or a dealer??
 

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I local dealer used to sell Scout boat a long time ago. I asked them why they stopped carrying them and they said it was a great boat, but, for warranty issues the company was bad.

That was a few years ago. It may have gotten better. I have ridden on a 17' Scout alot. It was an awesome awesome boat for the size and would kick the hecht out of most other similiar sized boats. I would imagine the ride on a big one like a 28 would be unbelievable.
 

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I got a 17 Scout and the thing is muscle. Grady is...well a Grady. I dont know about the bigger Scouts but the smaller ones are built like a brickhouse.
 

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I hear repeatedly from those who know boat construction that a boat with a well-constructed wood skeleton is still your best bet for a long-lasting hull. They tell me that many "no wood" hulls use glass stringers filled with foam. That foam can break down over time and does not provide the strength of wood. Also, in response to some transom issues in the past, Grady switched to some sort of green-wood brand that is supposedly nearly immune to rot and carries a long warranty.

Now, someone will point out all of my factual mistakes, but I should first warn them that I sayed in a Holiday Inn Express.
 

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I can only say as a Grady owner, I looked at many brands (not Scout) before buying mine five years ago and there were significant differences in the cheaper models I looked at. I have been very satified as a Grady owner and would definately recommend them.
 

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Not to bag on grady for the money its a nice boat, but for years I have been hanging around a friends fiberglass shop in pasadena and I can't tell you how many
gradys I have seen in there getting floors replaced, stringers with nothing but rotten wood, and a few transom's. At least 20, at least 5-6 a year.

Now I understand all boats have issues and a lot has to do with care by the owner, but man It has realy opened up my eye's, I don't care what the name
they are just boats with life spans, some are built to last longer then others.

Point being have a person knowledgable on boat surveying take a look at any boat you purchase, most issues are found after a excited owner starts looking around a
few months after a purchase, by then its to late.

Oh yeah I see robalos flotation water logged a lot, I owned a 1996 that had that was a mess.
 

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I got a 17 Scout and the thing is muscle. Grady is...well a Grady. I dont know about the bigger Scouts but the smaller ones are built like a brickhouse.
I bought a new 1998 Scout Sportfish 172 in April 1999. During June of that year I rode from the South River to Taylors Island on a calm day, then spent the night. On the following day, I returned 30-35 miles directly into a 3-ft chop. I had to slow down to 11 mph. When I eventually got back, I saw that about half of the screws holding the console to the floor had stripped out. This was a two-month old boat!

I had my Parker out many times in that type of sea conditions or worse and never had any concern about the boat holding together. In 7 years of running the Parker, none of the hardware cames loose or broke. I suspect that Grady's are made to similar quality standards.

Although I thought the Scout was a fine, roomy, and seaworthy 17' boat, I cannot rate it to the construction quality standards of some of the better boat brands out there, Parker and Grady included.
 

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Well, I am biased, I have a thirty year old Grady. Boottom line is SURVEY. I can't believe what I see sometimes, as far as accidents, groundings.
dropped boats, neglect etc. Get a good surveyer, and have him check that Grady out. I don't care how good a deal you think it might be.
 

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Scout vs Grady

My father has owned both brands and was happy with either one. Grady's are definitely more popular in this area so resale would probably be better. The Grady is probably heavier which has advantages (and some disadvantages). For used boats I would definitely have a surveyor help you make the choice.
 

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Not to bag on grady for the money its a nice boat, but for years I have been hanging around a friends fiberglass shop in pasadena and I can't tell you how many
gradys I have seen in there getting floors replaced, stringers with nothing but rotten wood, and a few transom's. At least 20, at least 5-6 a year.

Now I understand all boats have issues and a lot has to do with care by the owner, but man It has realy opened up my eye's, I don't care what the name
they are just boats with life spans, some are built to last longer then others.

Point being have a person knowledgable on boat surveying take a look at any boat you purchase, most issues are found after a excited owner starts looking around a
few months after a purchase, by then its to late.

Oh yeah I see robalos flotation water logged a lot, I owned a 1996 that had that was a mess.
Would'nt be Ferd's Place,Would it? [Mike]
 

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Not a boat expert but my 1989 204 c Grady is doing great exept for a few spider cracks, transom , and floor in great condition. The word I get is that they really hold their value if kept up and if you are not in a hurry you can find a deal. Good luck on whatever you buy
 
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