Tidal Fish Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll try to post more of these as I have time.... This one is of my parents' old sailboat in summer '82. This is how the upper-Severn around Indian Landing and Ben Oaks used to look. The background is Pointfield Landing, which in a few months would become covered with large homes, the shoreline reshaped by bulkheads and the water covered with docks. Route 97 did not yet exist. The area still had an "out-in-the-sticks" feel to it. The coming winter was the last time I saw the Y. Perch "fleet" of rowboats anchored and fishing the point at ice-out.

Old Severn Photo.jpg
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,107 Posts
Nice shot :thumbup:. The Severn holds alot of fond memories for me - I was very lucky and my parents had friends who lived in Arden on the Severn and that gave us access to the beaches/river year round.

I can remember fishing off the golf course near Sherwood forest-now all mega homes are there.

She is still a good river - I spend at least 4-5 days fishing her and 2-3 overnight trips in summer.Always wanted to live on the severn but it is out of my price range :eek: by a few zeros.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
She's definitely still a good river. As you can sort of see in the pic, the water was brown then, too. In some ways, the Severn has improved since then. It certainly did not have a Rockfishery back in the 80s or any SAV beds whatsoever, and now we have the oyster reefs going in, so not all is doom and gloom..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,255 Posts
Goose, I was up there this morning. Yeah, things have changed. Hard to believe that those homes weren't there until '82. Cool pic. Keep 'em coming.

I can remember fishing off the golf course near Sherwood forest-now all mega homes are there.
Skip, that was The Downs Yacht and Country Club...now just The Downs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,255 Posts
Ehem. Still waiting for more pics.

I'm sure attml has some also, as he spent a great deal of time on Round Bay with his grandmother. Mark?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,682 Posts
Was being a little lazy until Greg called me out:D For those of you who don't know, my family has lived in Round Bay since about 1907. My great grandfather was an electrical engineer who helped convert the B&O railroad over from steam to electric and was the first from my family to live in Round Bay. Here are some old pictures from the "good old days". Other family members have some older pictures but here are a few oldies I thought you guys might appreciate that I had on hand!

Cover of a program from the 1929 Round Bay Water Carnival that my grandmother had kept all of these years. The water carnival was like a fair with swimming and boat races and beauty contests, etc..


Picture from inside the Water Carnival program. My Grandfater and Uncle are in the canoe on the left (my aunt has the original of this picture).


My Aunt Dottie (Dorothy) listed in the program in Event 2 (100 Freestyle)


Boat on ground just south of Round Bay pier during a very low winter tide (circa 1945)


My dad (holding the oar) and buddies leaving round bay on a fishing /hunting trip in a cold rain (circa 1946)


My dad coming back from a camping trip just south of Forked Creek (notice the huge houses missing in the background -circa 1954).


My dad (seated front) and buddies on a crabbing / fishing trip - July, 1959)


The crabs were a lot bigger in thoses days. Check out the Carling Black Label sitting with the crabs. No pop tops on those cans!! They used the pointy end of the can opener to drink in thoses days. Imagine the tradgedy of loosing that overboard on a long weekend trip! :D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,682 Posts
Here are some more recent oldies of me as a little guy on the Severn!

Picture of me taken October of 1969 sitting in the water in Round Bay (I was 1 year, 1 month old in that picture).


Picture of me with Round Bay in the background (checking out the neighbor girl) I was almost 3 years old in that picture!


My brother, me & my Dad on a boat trip - August, 1971


Early pictures of my Dad's Skipjack the "Lizzie D". He built this boat from scratch himself in the woods behind the house and lauched it in 1971. This was an early picture because it doesn't have the full sized cabin built on it yet.


A later photo of the Lizzie D anchored in Round Bay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,255 Posts
I knew you'd come through. Awesome stuff Mark. :thumbup:

I think your dad was watching me fish on Friday. He was sitting out on your bench as I was throwing to some well-known pickerel grounds. That's right, pickerel, as I've thrown in the towel on those darn rock. I want my money back from DNR for my fishing license. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,017 Posts
Really cool pics and history. I bet the Severn was a whole lot nicer before it was so populated. I guess as one of the populace, I can't complain too loudly... (c:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'll be at my parent's today and will try to find time to dig through some more pics. I can't compete with the pic of Mark's grandfather riding on a giant oyster shell, though. That just goes to show you some of the fun things we could do if oysters ever came back to the size that they were back then.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,682 Posts
Thanks guys!

I have some more but that was all that I had time to scan last night. I have a lot of other pictures to go through. If I find some good ones I will post them!

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,894 Posts
Very cool pics... thanks for sharing these, guys!

I'm with you, Goose - who knew you could have so much fun with a giant oyster shell, a 2 horse motor, and a gigging stick?! :pp
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,262 Posts
Mark -

Thanks for posting the excellent nostalgic photos. I do wonder, however, about the photo of you sitting in the water. That brown stain seems to originate from you!:nono: No wonder Chris' turd lure has been effective -- the local fish are acclimated to that as a search image.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,902 Posts
Great old photos, guys. Brought back some nice memories.

It's sure not the same river today - - took this pic while fishing on Friday. Guess some people don't like looking at trees :((
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
I believe that what you're seeing there is what has become a very sad story on many levels:

First, during one of the heavy rains last May, this family lost a large chunk of its real estate, including a portion of its patio/pool area. Much of the house structure is also threatened.

Next, a number of folks seemed to loudly celebrate this fact as a "serves you right" example of what happens when a person insists on building too close to the water. Even though they are correct that this should be a cautionary tale, and the original builder did likely seek and obtain variances to build closer to the water than the default rule allows, I still feel badly for anyone who is in danger of losing their home. I feel even more badly if the person who purchased the home is not the original builder. This should be approached from an educational standpoint, not gloating.

Finally, if I'm correct (and I may not be), this particular property owner has sought to extend his property into the Severn to help protect it from further erosion. While I understand the desperation that any of us might go through when trying to save our home, hopefully cooler heads will prevail at the state/county level. Given the amount of equipment at the base of the cliff, however, I fear that our river has once again been sold out to the few.

People cannot be permitted to usurp a portion of the public's waterways for their own personal benefit, especially when the problem occurred because they built/purchased a home that was placed in a risky area to begin with. Nobody forced them to take that risk, and although our governments appear to be in the risk-softening business lately, I hope that they stop using tax dollars to guarantee property investments, especially when the result takes away and diminishes a public resource like the Severn. To be fair, many people, through placing riprap below the mean-high-water-mark, already do this, so this homeowner is no worse than many others. My hope is that the new mandatory living shoreline law will greatly reduce this practice.

P.S.: I should add that another possibility exists: The homeowner may be in the process of implimenting a living shoreline plan to control erosion, which would probably be the most effective thing that he could do. I have not heard anything about this, so I have my doubts, but I'll try to see what I can learn. Maybe JPW can chime in if his multiple eyes and ears have learned anything about this.

P.P.S.: I should also add that I think that we've only begun to scratch the surface on what will become a huge problem of homes in danger of sliding into the Severn. At least a half-dozen homes became in serious danger as a result of the heavy rains this May. Most of those are obvious from tarps/construction equipment. What is not obvious are the many more whose owners are faced with the daunting task of adding very deep concrete footers to their foundation to stop their home's migragtion down a steep sloap. My brother told me that this is happening to some homes in his community of Epping Forest, often at the cost of $100k or more and often without any guaruntee from the engineer that it will ultimately work.

As all of us know, the Severn is loaded with homes perched precariously at a cliff's edge or right on very steep sloaps. Many of those were once cottages or modest homes. Especially over the past decade, however, many (perhaps most) of these have expanded significantly, often doubling, tripling or more in size. Similarly huge homes have been built on steep "infill" lots. I'm not an engineer, but considering the greatly increased weight and likely increased septic field saturation for these homes, I believe that the problems for homes on the Severn's edge have just begun. This has huge implications for our river, since I expect a continuing fight over the extent to which these homeowners can alter the shoreline to protect their property.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,902 Posts
Sorry, Jeff - didn't mean to hijack your good pictures post with bad news - but difference in "the way it used to be" vs. "the way it is now" really struck home with me while I was fishing last week.

I had not really looked closely at the picture I took, but after reading the info you provided about this house, I went back and zoomed in on the picture - and everything you said was right on target. Wow - I'm no engineer, but I'd be surprised if they can really save this house in the long term. The bank has given way right up to the house and even under the concrete patio already.



Not sure what they are doing at this site right now - looks like they are still cleaning up tree trunks and other debris from the hillside and have installed a temporary bulkhead along part of the site. Living shoreline here? I wouldn't hold my breath on that one. Long term outlook for this site - ????




I hate to see anybody lose their house so I'm afraid I'm not a member of the gloating "serves you right" group. There's plenty of blame to go around to cover everybody - the home owner/buyer who really should have known better - the engineers who designed the building - the county/state officials who approved variances and allowed this level of density. I'm sure there are a few others as well.

I think you are correct that we are only seeing the beginning of this. Your obvervations about the weight of the buildings and the large septic fields underminng the ground structure make perfect sense. - - all that liquid you see coming out of the cliffs along the Severn is NOT rainwater filtering through the ground...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
no hijack at all....I thought that the pic raised an impotant issue and just wanted to clarify that it wasn't a tree-clearing operation (although that does occur on the Severn). The gloating group is a different bunch, not on TF (as far as I know).

I can't imagine what they can do. I would think that the patio is a goner and all effort will need to be on saving the actual house. Cliffs erode...sometimes in huge chunks. As one person on the Severn River Commission stated, this is "geology at work." However, I suspect that the things I mentioned help geology work on a faster time frame than it otherwise might.

Another interesting thing that may not have been studied on the Severn is the impact of all of the hardened shoreline on these cliffs. People are so concerned with boat wakes....and that seems like a legit issue in the main river -- but these hardened shorelines also prevent the natural transfer of sand onto the beaches, causing the prtective beaches to more easily disappear. A vivid example of this is Shark's Tooth Beach on the Virgina side of the lower-Potomac.

Bottom line....you will usually lose if you fight nature. Working with, rather than against, nature is not only less expensive initially, it may cost you far less in the long run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,541 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I just noticed the floating boom around the barge. I've seen this on many shoreline projects....it's always positioned just like in your photo. Is the purpose to make sure that all spilled diesel stays close to shore so that the little remaining wetland is destroyed?:rolleyes: I'd think you'd want it to float into the open where it has a better chance to evaporate/break-up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,262 Posts
I just noticed the floating boom around the barge. I've seen this on many shoreline projects....it's always positioned just like in your photo. Is the purpose to make sure that all spilled diesel stays close to shore so that the little remaining wetland is destroyed?:rolleyes: I'd think you'd want it to float into the open where it has a better chance to evaporate/break-up.
The spill prevention requirements of DNR and the Coast Guard want any spilled oil to be kept as contained as possible. You may be correct that it is more likely to harm things at the shoreline, but this approach minimizes the surface area over which oil can spread.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top