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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have covered this somewhat before but wanted to post some additional pics and how-to discussion since the weather is too cold to build. Not that I'm an expert and there are better scarfing systems... but this is mine. Scarfing or joining wood together is a critical part of modern wooden boat-building.
NOTE: Images below are out of order but you can figure it out.

Start with one 4x8 sheet of plywood upside down because when you flip and joint them, the grain is correct. I show you both pieces of wood with the Lloyds stamps up but one should be down and one up. All my remaining scarfs were/will be this way. I show a power-planer ($100 for Makita) and a hand-planer. What I don't show is my random-orbital sander that I used to feather the edges far more than you see in these pics. Take the edges down to almost nothing to get a great seam.

The scarfing table was made totally from scraps I pulled out of a dumpster behind Circuit City. Yes, I'm a dumpster diver. A table with an extension for plywood should be close to 16 feet but 12 works. Mine is short but you can't see the braces under the wood hanging over. Works fine. Some people use ping-pong tables.

Line your sheets of plywood and measure back 3 inches each, planing an area of 6 inches total. Draw a clear line 3 inches above the top board and clamp everything down so it doesn't move.

Start with the power planer at a 45 degree angle (angle shown below as tools are stationary)... pull across one way and then the other evenly. Use your eye to check eveness. Then use a hand planer and finally an electric sander or block until you get two wedges. You'll have a tendency not to take enough off the fist time you do this but you want them to look like one solid piece when sandwiched together.

Put painter's plastic under the scarf joints in the middle or you will be in big trouble later (glued to the table) because epoxy oozes out as you screw and weight down the joints. I add tape across the joints also because it reduces the glue that ends up on your boards. Mix 2-part epoxy and paint the joints, then butter them again with epoxy / cotton filler to a heavy-cream consistency. Put the joints together and have a 2x4 handy to put on the edge of your plywood ensure you are lined-up straight. Also ensure that your edges are lined up perfect because it's easy not to be lined up well - so draw easy to see lined.

I pre-drill screw holes about every 5 or 6 inches, 1/8" in from the narrow edges, so your screws are about 5 3/4" apart (facing) all the way across. I also add concrete blocks for additional pressure but my table flexes, it's not solid - so you may not need these. I'm happy with my scarf-joints. After you have everything glued, screwed and pressure applied, let the epoxy sit to cure and don't mess with it for at least 24 hrs. @ 70 degrees, preferably 48 hrs. @ at least 60 degrees.
 

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Looks good Jim. How many sheets do you end up scarfing?

About the transom, I think I am going with the more expensive sapele so I can epoxy/varnish it for the wood grain look. Also I think I will make the gunwale wood finished and paint the rest of the boat. Off white inside, red bottom and green planks.

What do ya think?

I think I'll name it the LR Simmons in honer of my son!

-D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
LR Simmons

D- So far, I've used two 9mm sheets for the garboards, two 9 mm for the bottom and one full 18mm sheet for the transom. You'll use one 18mm (3/4") 4x8 with very little left-over for both motor box and transom. I like your idea of Sapele for the transom because they look great au-natural.' Bottom is the same, one full sheet with very little left over. Transfer all of your lines from Dave's transom and motor-box drawings to the wood using a blue pencil or something that you can see later as you are placing the strakes. He did a great job with those. The one piece you have left over will be used to double up the front of the motor box once you flip the boat right-side up, with only a few inches total excess. I have a piece of leftover scarfed 9mm in my garage from the garboard that I can use for approx 2 more strakes and then need two more sheets total to finish all the strakes.... hopefully. Need to work it out on paper. Otherwise I can buy one sheet, split it down the middle and scarf it together as one 2x16, which would get me 3 strakes. Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Easy

Polecat - I'm a novice but love it and cannot wait until I have more time to devote to building. If I had 1/10 of the knowledge you have about crabbing, rigging and everything related... I would be set. I get by but before I retire in 2 years, I want to learn what I can from you. I look forward to reading your posts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Keel Notches

D- No, just straight cuts with a circular/jig saw or band saw and it's only a channel for water to run through the center, right above the bottom of the boat. Jim
 
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