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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had a sneak preview. It should be a fascinating look at the health of the Severn (both good and bad points, and some surprises). Go to Severn River Association for details.

Speakers and their topics include:

Former state Sen. Gerald W. Winegrad, University of Maryland: What Needs to be Done to Restore the Severn and the Bay?

Dr. Kurt Riegel, president of the Severn River Association: State of the Severn.

Dr. Pierre Henkart, Severn Riverkeeper Program: Severn Water Quality, 2006 to 2008.

Dr. Sally Hornor, Anne Arundel Community College: Operation Clearwater: Microbial Water Quality Monitoring in the Severn River.

Ron Bowen, director of county Department of Public Works: Severn River Watershed Challenges.

Mike Lehman, American Forests: Forestation Trends and Their Significance.

Ted Gattino, Severn Riverkeeper Program: Impervious Surface Changes and Water Quality in the Severn River.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll post more details when I have time, but it was interesting. The fact that haunts me the most is this little gem from Ron Bowen: The base flow for many of the Severn's streams is septic effluent. That's right; the streams are basically septic water leaching through the ground and keeping these streams flowing during dry whether. The apparent reason is that so much of the land surface is hardened that rain water that would normally, slowly seep into the ground and feed these streams at a steady rate instead races off roofs, streets, direveways, parking lots, etc. directly into storm drains and into the Severn. The only remaining steady source of groundwater in many areas is from septic tanks.

Think of that next time you see a babbling brook.
 

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Interesting. Would have loved to have been there but work called.

What is their answer, or thier plan of action?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
For the Severn, the plan is to continue to use flush fee money to pay for people to upgrade their septic systems to state-of-the-art nitrogen reduction models. The fee money pays 100% of the cost for the new system (although other charges, such as a new drain field if necessary, may apply).

The problem is currently a lack of folks interested in doing this. The next step, then, is to make such upgrades mandatory for anyone within 1000 feet of the water. I think that's coming sooner rather than later.

Another discussion point was pressuring the county council to pass a stormwater fee to start making a dent in the $1 billion-plus in stormwater retrofits.

And of course, we have oysters....which were barely mentioned.....but may be the most promising way to clean the river for a tiny fraction of the cost of any of these other alternatives. A certain county council member is going to call me about that.
 

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I look at some of the nice homes on the taller cliffs and can't help but realize the sepyic system free flowing into the river.

Since water seeks the path of least resistance- the toilet water seeps out from the side.One reason certain parts of cliffs fall more then others.

The Severn is a special river - I hope it returns one day to how I remember it.

Lush grass beds- plenty of fish/crabs and clean dark water.Winter was always something- often we could see down 6-7 feet :yes:.Growing up -money was tight and one January day-I saw a like new Mepps spinner on a log.Took off my coat,sweatshirt and shirt and reached down to get it.I tried until my head was in the water but could not reach it.What looked to be 2 feet down was really 4 feet- that's how clear the water was.

My buddy (who had a brain :D) use his fishing rod tip to snag the lure while I shivered :rolleyes:.
 
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