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Excellent article! I wish that conference had been better publicized. What a critical topic. I attended a similar conference at Brookings Institute back when I was a Heritage Foundation college intern. The panelists, conservative, liberal and in-between, came to pretty much the same conclusions.

Most of our localities have hitched their fiscal wagon to the easy, fast money of encouraging forests to be bulldozed and replaced with subdivisions. They've done this without recognizing the long-term costs. Developers and large landowners internalize the profits and externalize the costs. It's a payday loan mentality and the interest payments are piling up for local governments.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Excellent article! I wish that conference had been better publicized. What a critical topic. I attended a similar conference at Brookings Institute back when I was a Heritage Foundation college intern. The panelists, conservative, liberal and in-between, came to pretty much the same conclusions.

Most of our localities have hitched their fiscal wagon to the easy, fast money of encouraging forests to be bulldozed and replaced with subdivisions. They've done this without recognizing the long-term costs. Developers and large landowners internalize the profits and externalize the costs. It's a payday loan mentality and the interest payments are piling up for local governments.
We could take some lessons from the Germans on this.
 

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At the end of the day everything has an economic value. The voters determine the priority of each thing by electing the people they do. As anglers, hunters, and nature lovers, we are in the minority in how we value natural resources. It's the large, long term land usage that determines the effect on the local environment. Ever since the settlers first settlers came to these shores, the land has been in the process of being converted from a vast wilderness to a mix of industrial, residential, and agricultural areas. At the end of the day, the money we spend needs to have a return on investment and this is where we reach big limitations on restoration of natural areas in highly developed areas. I think the best things we can do are to legislate healthier land use practices and to focus on initiatives like oyster restoration. These are affordable things that can mitigate the impact of our changes to the landscape. It's a tough issue, and an emotionally charged one for anyone who appreciates these areas.
 

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Thanks for the link! I believe it is crucially important for society to openly debate the philosophical principles of infinite increases in consumption and population.

I cringe every time I see those AT&T ads with the kids that say, “It’s not complicated… bigger is better.” Unfortunately, this sums up the guiding principle of our society.

Until we have a societal shift, there will only be patching of ever-increasing holes in a leaky bucket known as the bay… and our ONE world.

I’m interested to read the next article on population growth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Dueling views of population growth.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/...ation-global-united-nations-2100-boom-africa/

I would believe our present economic model that is based on continued growth is unsustainable.
Some northern European nations are already operating on a different model Germany to name one.
Interesting how things change I have a medal from 1909 called the Kaiser's motherhood medal that was awarded to a mother after the birth of her third child.
 
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