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I have a bunch of solid blanks. Probably 7' with a #10 tip. I think I could cut either end and get almost any action. I was thinking of using them for striper trolling rods. Trouble is they are uncoated. Should I use fiberglass resin or epoxy resin or epoxy rod coat and coat the whole blank first or wrap and then coat. Hep me....
 

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I used them back a number of years ago and I would wrap them and then coat the entire rod with flex coat. The only problem is after 2 or 3 years they would turn yellow. Now of course I don't use the solid glass blanks but a friend of mine uses them he sprays them with epoxy paint and then wraps them. He can make just about any color blank using the paint.
Capt. Steve Seigel
 

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I paint first then wrap then coat. Have some that are real old with no problems.

I wish you could still by solids. For some things they are a lot better than hollow. Boat rods wire line rods etc

Boats
 

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Pursuit, I have done just like Capt. Steve friend did sprays them with epoxy paint and they trurned out very nice, just watch out for runs I had a few the first time.

Boats, you can still get solid blanks heres a web site

Fiberglass rod blanks - Netcraft
 

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Why do you want to apply finish to the entire rod? Is the surface too rough to wrap?Permagloss would probably work. I think some people have had success with some automotive paints. While I have not tried using them myself, I understand from others that Flexcoat and other finishes typically are not suitable to coat an entire blank.
 

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Steve

Good tip. I bought from Netcraft years ago but have not looked at there stuff recently.

Thanks

Boats
 

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On the finish. Wraping solid blanks just like they came from the factory is no problem. I have some boat rods built over 30 years ago with no finish and they are fine. Am restoring an old Montague wire line rod now that must be 50 years old and is is green and slightly matt just like Shakespere "I guess" made it.

You can sand them out and paint. You want to work through the grits getting real fine. 400 is only a starting point. It's possable to sand throught 1500 grit if you have the patience. It only takes a few strokes grit to grit. Fine grits remove so little they are no problem even on light tubular blanks.

I have about given up on Flexcoat and now use Aftcote.

Boats
 
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