Tidal Fish Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last year when I had my trailer inspected I was told that this year I would have to have the shoes replaced. Well, I've been considering converting from drum to disc brakes and have been doing a little shopping around.

There are two different sets I'm considering. One set has stainless steel calipers but the majority of the other components are cadmium plated. The other set at about 2.5 times the price is mainly all stainless steel.

I'm very conscientious (some would say anal) about flushing my brakes each time I launch and recover the boat. So my question to the learned group here is ......

Should I spring for the set that is mainly stainless steel at 2.5 times the price or would the other set do me??????

Thanks in advance!!!

Tight lines,
Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
Dan,

Having owned both forms of the discs brakes you are referring to there is a lot more difference then just one being almost all stainless (Kodiaks) and the other being only partly stainless (Tie Down).

The Kodiaks are designed much better from the caliper to the rotors and how they work. They apply pressure more evenly, have less drag and don't tend to bind on one side like the Tie Downs will. Also, Kodiak Stainless is warranted for life and they stand behind their product, I can't say the same about the Tie Downs. Go on the hull truth's website and do a search and you will find more than you ever wanted to know. Kodiak also makes a set, same design as the all stainless but are cadmium, those are very good as well but of course will not last as long as the all stainless.

In this situation you kind of get what you pay for. If you don't plan on selling your trailer anytime soon and what piece of mind then you should get the Kodiaks. Remember, you will need to remove the check valve or punch a hole in it inside your coupler because you have a drum brake coupler that always keeps pressure in the lines and will cause disc brakes to drag and burn them up leading to all sorts of problems.

Hope this helps and good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
I bought the tiedowns in a kit from eastern marine. I haven't had any issues with the brakes but the rubber brake lines had very thin flares on the fittings that cracked. I found an auto parts store that sold 3/16 steel brakel lines that I installed. It took the better part of a day to mod the trailer and splice in the 5 pin trailer wiring. Disk brakes don't back up without a electric solenoid connected to the backup lights. Don't put drum brakes back on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
I have a tripple axle trailer under my boat that is equipped with 2 pairs of Kodiak cadium disk brakes.So far I am very pleased with them.I previously had a 24ft. Abemarle with Tie Down disc brakes on a tandem axle trailer-I had problems with them.It could have been because they were the first generation Tie Down disc brakes.I am also very particular about washing the salt water off of my boat & trailer. RED EYE-24 Topaz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks!!

All,

Thanks for the information!!! Both versions of disc brakes that I am considering, the cadmium plated and the stainless steel brakes are Kodiak.

I'm leaning towards biting the bullet and getting the all stainless. Heck, I'm 51 and with proper maintenance the stainless should last me the remainder of my fishin' days !!!

Lance .... great post on the other board. You could take that information and make a training film!!

Tight lines,
Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
970 Posts
This thread will document swapping out my drum brakes and actuator for new Kodiak disc brakes and a Tiedown 70E actuator with built in reversing solenoid. The weather is forecast to be cold and I'm really busy at work, so this is going to take a few days. I'll be adding pics and dialogue as I progress through the project. Last night was the first step, receipt of the goods.



On the first side, I had already started disassembly as part of diagnosing my original problem. I had the boat jacked up and the wheel tire removed already. Any fasteners to be removed were "pre-soaked" in PB Blaster. Step one started like this:



There aren't many parts in disk brakes. The hub / rotor are one piece, then there is the caliper and caliper mounting bracket. That's about it. These brakes come with new bearings and the races are already pressed in. The hammer and block of wood shown were used to press in the rear seals.



The entire drum brake assembly is removed by removing the 4 bolts that go through the brake mounting flange on the axle. After the flange was cleaned up with a wire brush, the new caliper mounting bracket is bolted on.



The next step is to install the hub / rotor assembly and the outer bearing.



Now I installed the provided dust cover. Kodiak supplies a nice piece that can be used with grease or oil bath.



Nearing the end of side one, the caliper is mounted with two bolts, which are the "caliper slides." I gave these a light coating of high temp grease.



The next two photos show the brake line modifications. The drum brakes had hard lines running to them. Because the calipers slide, they had to use flex hoses. Thanks go to Gibbons Auto Parts in Pocomoke, MD. When I went to the counter and told them what I was trying do, they got me setup with what I needed. Try that at your big box store...





Side one is complete now.



Side two is much of a duplicate process. I used "never-seize" on all hardware possible and grease most everywhere else.







Drum brakes have a lot of parts compared to the three components of the disks.



This pic shows a dust cover preloaded with grease and ready to be installed.



The next pic is of the hub / rotor installed and packed with grease. When I pack my hubs there is no air void left. I don't use "bearing buddies." I feel that as long as my grease doesn't get out, no water is getting in.



The TieDown Engineering Model 70 actuator is a nice piece. Most agree that their brakes suck, but they make a nice coupler. Note the safety pin right behind the ball. When the pin is inserted the coupler can't come off the ball, even if it comes unlatched up top. This model also has s built in reverse solenoid.





And this project is complete. It was a gray and rainy morning, but we got the job done. I'm home from a 40 mile test ride in one piece, and I managed to fill the boat up with gas while I was out, so add another $75 to the project total.



Airslot, out
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That's the place

budc,

After reading responses to people's questions regarding who does trailer maintenance in the area and the answer consistantly coming up Portsmouth Trailer ... that decision was easy!!!

Tight lines,
Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
My two year old trailer has the tie-down disc brakes. When I went to get it inspected last May (first time since I bought it) the inspector (at Norfolk Truck Center) told me that my outer pads were almost worn out. This after one year, and only two long trips (most trips are from Tidewater drive to NAB Little Creek). I found that the caliper was frozen, that one side wasn't releasing. When I reassembled them, I put a coating of high temp marine grease on the bolts that the cailper is supposed to slide upon. I just hope it fixed the problem.

If it happens again, I just might switch to the Kodiak brakes.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top