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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the Baltimore area and have a 2004 22' Whaler whose transom has started to rot and needs attention. The only way to access the plywood is to cut through the outside of the transom. Have you had a similar repair done on a fiberglass boat? Who did the work and were you happy with the repair? Thanks.
 

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Go to the Classic Mako website. There are transom projects that will show photos and step by step explanation of that repair. I did a 16 foot skiff and it turned out really well.
 

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I just went to website . 190 pages of projects. There is a search box. It will bring up lots of info. I used to have a 77 19' Mako for 25 years.
 

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IF you're considering doing the job yourself ... I've done 2 transom recores on old Grady's. (Each was about 30 years old at the time.) The first was part of a virtual restoration (a REAL "project" boat) and was a strictly wing and a prayer kinda thing but came out surprisingly well. Second one I contacted a couple shops and the prices quoted were just plain scary. And a few said they'd only do a job like that over the winter when they had time.

Sooo, did some research and took it on myself. Lots of info available online and in books. Mostly I used West System's suggested process with some personal adjustments. It's a hell of a job and isn't cheap even if you do it yourself. But it's quite rewarding when you're done. (And the Admiral felt a lot safer!)

Good luck whichever way you go.

Bob
Grady 20
 

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Go to the iboats forum and read/ search through the boat restoration page. There are a lot of great guys there with a ton of experince. Also look at using a permanent solution such as sea cast. I also believe the proper way to do that repair is cut the inside out not from outside.
 

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If you are the original owner- I would push on whaler a bit. A transom should not be rotten in that short of time if it was built correctly. That said if it was severly mid treated that's on you.

And yes, do the repair from the inside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That's not a very old boat? Did something go wrong?
You're right. It's not that old and I'm not real happy about it either. The rot is starting at the top on the starboard side and working down. The only thing that makes sense is there must be an issue where the top half of the boat is joined to the hull. Water must be running down along the rub rail which covers that seam and getting into the top of a poorly sealed transom. Nothing else makes sense to me.
 

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Whalerron,

Can’t speak for the 2004 Whalers but if they’re similar to the older classics re-think your approach. I am a Whaler fan at heart but one bad characteristic of whalers is water intrusion and saturating the foam. Hopefully Whaler used a different type of foam for the 2004 models than they did with the older models. The reason being is the older foam absorbs water much like a sponge and doesn’t release it. I can tell you that from hands on experience. With that said, more than likely the foam around your transom is saturated. By accessing the transom from the inside will allow you to dig out and replace any wet foam. It will also give you piece of mind knowing you hull doesn’t have water in it as a lot of older Whaler do.

If you plan to do this yourself find the website called Whalercentral.com or Continuouswave.com. They are both BW sites. Do a search and you will find articles about transom replacement.

I need to do one myself so please take lots of pictures.

Don.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Can u show a pic?
Which part of the boat do you want to see? I haven't cut into the transom. So, I don't have any rotten wood to show you. Right now, I am assuming the worse because I have tea colored water coming out of the transom around the transom drain tube in the bilge area and also out of the transom around the starboard splashwell drain tube. I have removed both splashwell drain tubes because both were loose. Additionally, where the inner tube piece slides into the outer tube piece, there was no sealer. I now think the water has been getting in around these 3 press together drain tubes ( I haven't pulled the transom drain tube yet). The plywood is definitely wet in the 2 splashwell drain tube holes in the transom. I have bought the replacement tubes but I haven't installed them yet.

The transom in these boats contains 3 side-by-side pieces of 1-1/2" plywood. I did a sounding on the transom with a ball peen hammer and the transom sounds good for the center piece of plywood to which the motor is mounted. The starboard piece gives dull thuds as I move up the hull toward the top. It sounds real hard below the water line but the thuds get more noticeable as I move up from there. That is not a good sign. The port piece of plywood is about the same as the starboard piece but it is not quite as bad.

The newer Whalers are made with closed cell foam which will not absorb water. Actually, the older whalers were made with closed cell foam too but some years ago, Tom Clark gave a good dissertation on Continuous Wave about how water would get into cracks of the old foam and freeze. That would cause hairline fractures in the foam which would allow water to seem further into the foam through capillary action and the cycle would continue. The foam could then hold an astounding amount of water without actually absorbing the water into the foam's air cells.

I am the second owner of this boat and I have had it for 2 years. I store the boat covered on a trailer in my yard. The boat was stored in the water by the previous owner. The previous owner didn't baby this boat or give it any TLC but it doesn't show signs of abuse or hull damage either.

Despite what may be transom issues, I really like this boat and if necessary, I will get it fixed and keep the boat.

- ron
 

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Which part of the boat do you want to see? I haven't cut into the transom. So, I don't have any rotten wood to show you. Right now, I am assuming the worse because I have tea colored water coming out of the transom around the transom drain tube in the bilge area and also out of the transom around the starboard splashwell drain tube. I have removed both splashwell drain tubes because both were loose. Additionally, where the inner tube piece slides into the outer tube piece, there was no sealer. I now think the water has been getting in around these 3 press together drain tubes ( I haven't pulled the transom drain tube yet). The plywood is definitely wet in the 2 splashwell drain tube holes in the transom. I have bought the replacement tubes but I haven't installed them yet.

The transom in these boats contains 3 side-by-side pieces of 1-1/2" plywood. I did a sounding on the transom with a ball peen hammer and the transom sounds good for the center piece of plywood to which the motor is mounted. The starboard piece gives dull thuds as I move up the hull toward the top. It sounds real hard below the water line but the thuds get more noticeable as I move up from there. That is not a good sign. The port piece of plywood is about the same as the starboard piece but it is not quite as bad.

The newer Whalers are made with closed cell foam which will not absorb water. Actually, the older whalers were made with closed cell foam too but some years ago, Tom Clark gave a good dissertation on Continuous Wave about how water would get into cracks of the old foam and freeze. That would cause hairline fractures in the foam which would allow water to seem further into the foam through capillary action and the cycle would continue. The foam could then hold an astounding amount of water without actually absorbing the water into the foam's air cells.

I am the second owner of this boat and I have had it for 2 years. I store the boat covered on a trailer in my yard. The boat was stored in the water by the previous owner. The previous owner didn't baby this boat or give it any TLC but it doesn't show signs of abuse or hull damage either.

Despite what may be transom issues, I really like this boat and if necessary, I will get it fixed and keep the boat.

- ron
Ron don't think u have a rot prob . Pull out old drain tubes wood is probabley damp from leakage let dry. Jack front of boat up drill test hole 1/4" is all that is needed drill holes below brown spots about 2" or so just thru glass till u hit wood.i own an outrage came out of Florida 1989 I completely restored put a new floor in transom had stains to around brass drain tubes but no rot. Easy fix. Good luck.mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ron don't think u have a rot prob .
I hope you are right!

When I drilled holes to mount the transducer, clear water drops came out of one of the holes. None of the woodshavings from any of the holes were dry. There is an old hole about midway up the starboard side of the transom and it was filled by the previous owner with an epoxy filler. That spot has just started to emit a brown stain. I will drill that out in the next day or so to repatch it and to check the condition of the wood there.

I have always had brown water showing up in the dimple in the bilge just in front of transom drain. The 2 splashwell drain tubes and the transom drain tube are all of the same design and all are made of plastic. 1/2 of the tube goes into the transom hole from the inside and the other 1/2 goes into the hole from the outside. One of the tubes is slightly smaller than the other and it slides in and locks inside of the larger tube. They are similar to: http://www.basspro.com/TH-Marine-Splash-Well-Drain/product/101651/

Whaler did not put any sealer where the tubes fit inside each other and over time, water has leaked through that joint into the transom. Over time, it also seems that the plastic has shrunk in diameter. They also used very little sealer when sealing the tube assembly to the transom and recently those outer surface joints have started to let the water leak back out of the transom around the tubes.

Last summer, at about 1 week intervals when the air temperature was above 80, I put a plug in the outside of the transom tube which is also the larger of the 2 tube pieces. On the inside of the transom, I put a suction cup over the transom hole and connected an A/C vacuum pump to that suction cup. Through a series of fitting and hoses, I connected a jar in the vacuum line to collect moisture. I then ran the pump and let it pull 30 in/mg for 1 hour. The pump would pull vacuum in the transom around the tube by drawing on the minuscule gap between the 2 tube pieces. The idea here is that at 80 degrees and 30 in/mg of vacuum, water will readily boil and that boiled off moisture can be removed with the vacuum pump. Each session, I would collect about 1/2 cup of water. After that, no more water would come out with the vacuum.

It is also worth noting that I use the boat about once per week and it gets washed after every outing. This has the potential to add water where I had just removed it.

I have drilled 2 test holes near the bottom of the starboard transom and although the shavings were damp, my vacuum pump would not pull water out of either hole.

To date, I have not found any rotten wood. None. Everything is damp but there is absolutely no flex in the transom when I bounce on the low end of the outboard.

I am going to take the boat to a fiberglass/transom guy near Fort Smallwood to have him evaluate the transom for me. He did tell me that if the wood is wet, it eventually will turn to mulch and need to be replaced. He said that he should be able to give me a good idea of how long the transom will last before it needs to be replaced.

Ironically, 2 years ago, a Marine Surveyor told me that late model Whalers are notorious for having wet transoms.

Despite all of this I really like the 220 Dauntless. This is a great boat. If indeed the transom needs replacement, I will get the work done and keep the boat. I just sold my 1969 16'7" Whaler which I had owned for 35 years. It was a great boat but I actually like the Dauntless more and I want to keep it just as long.
 

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I hope you are right!

When I drilled holes to mount the transducer, clear water drops came out of one of the holes. None of the woodshavings from any of the holes were dry. There is an old hole about midway up the starboard side of the transom and it was filled by the previous owner with an epoxy filler. That spot has just started to emit a brown stain. I will drill that out in the next day or so to repatch it and to check the condition of the wood there.

I have always had brown water showing up in the dimple in the bilge just in front of transom drain. The 2 splashwell drain tubes and the transom drain tube are all of the same design and all are made of plastic. 1/2 of the tube goes into the transom hole from the inside and the other 1/2 goes into the hole from the outside. One of the tubes is slightly smaller than the other and it slides in and locks inside of the larger tube. They are similar to: http://www.basspro.com/TH-Marine-Splash-Well-Drain/product/101651/

Whaler did not put any sealer where the tubes fit inside each other and over time, water has leaked through that joint into the transom. Over time, it also seems that the plastic has shrunk in diameter. They also used very little sealer when sealing the tube assembly to the transom and recently those outer surface joints have started to let the water leak back out of the transom around the tubes.

Last summer, at about 1 week intervals when the air temperature was above 80, I put a plug in the outside of the transom tube which is also the larger of the 2 tube pieces. On the inside of the transom, I put a suction cup over the transom hole and connected an A/C vacuum pump to that suction cup. Through a series of fitting and hoses, I connected a jar in the vacuum line to collect moisture. I then ran the pump and let it pull 30 in/mg for 1 hour. The pump would pull vacuum in the transom around the tube by drawing on the minuscule gap between the 2 tube pieces. The idea here is that at 80 degrees and 30 in/mg of vacuum, water will readily boil and that boiled off moisture can be removed with the vacuum pump. Each session, I would collect about 1/2 cup of water. After that, no more water would come out with the vacuum.

It is also worth noting that I use the boat about once per week and it gets washed after every outing. This has the potential to add water where I had just removed it.

I have drilled 2 test holes near the bottom of the starboard transom and although the shavings were damp, my vacuum pump would not pull water out of either hole.

To date, I have not found any rotten wood. None. Everything is damp but there is absolutely no flex in the transom when I bounce on the low end of the outboard.

I am going to take the boat to a fiberglass/transom guy near Fort Smallwood to have him evaluate the transom for me. He did tell me that if the wood is wet, it eventually will turn to mulch and need to be replaced. He said that he should be able to give me a good idea of how long the transom will last before it needs to be replaced.

Ironically, 2 years ago, a Marine Surveyor told me that late model Whalers are notorious for having wet transoms.

Despite all of this I really like the 220 Dauntless. This is a great boat. If indeed the transom needs replacement, I will get the work done and keep the boat. I just sold my 1969 16'7" Whaler which I had owned for 35 years. It was a great boat but I actually like the Dauntless more and I want to keep it just as long.
as i said in an earlier post- i would be all over boston whaler on this. you pay a premium for the product, they should take care of this.
 

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"Ironically, 2 years ago, a Marine Surveyor told me that late model Whalers are notorious for having wet transoms."

Interesting. I have not found very many documented late model Whaler transoms replacements.

Assuming you had your boat surveyed, what did he have to say about yours at the time? I am also interested in what a replacement would cost and est. time.

Best of luck.
 

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I agree. You paid top dollar so this would not happen. One question. Was the motor rigged by Whaler as well?
Good question. If the through bolts securing the motor to the transom were not sealed properly, this breech will allow water penatration into the transom. It is amazing such an expensive boat has this problem. Good luck.......... Gary
 
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