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Need some help guys. when trolling a boat with two engines what happens. Do you use one engine at a time or both to keep the boat straight? Also, in the Chesapeake bay would a inboard on a 29' boat kept in the water be a better choice due to corrosive problems. I know the stern drives have greater speed and fuel economy but I usually don't travel more than 12-15 miles, and don't want to use a boat lift. I currently have a single engine stern drive. Thanks
 

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I personally would never keep an IO boat in the water, too much fouling. Inboards stay in pretty decent shape although you'll get growth on the running gear but the prop will stay in good shape if run often enough. An inboard will track straight on 1 as that's what I did to troll for rock (speed issue). I would sometimes have to switch engines if I had to make a turn although she would turn starboard w/the starboard engine (for example). Usually depends on how much rudder you got under her and runtime parameters.
 

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Inboards, all the way. Less maintenance, less to break, all around more reliable. Never mind manuverability. I'll never understand why Albemarle is so fond of that jackshaft/stern drive setup.:confused:

My last boat had twin inboards & I tried to shut down one & run on the other for economy purposes & speed. She wouldn't troll at 3 knots with both screws turning, actually she went 5.5 knots at 800 rpm. If the seas/current was ahead that was ok. Following or abeam, not so good. I had bigger rudders installed & that helped but I finally had trolling valves installed on the trannies, took care of the problem. After that she would troll at 2.5 knots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the reply's. Most every has advised me to get the inboards for the bay.
Reel fine time: Approximately how much would trolling valves cost to install.
 

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double edged sword...

yes, i/o's are more maintenance and stuff to go wrong but they give you a shallower draft, better economy, and better speed than a straight inboard. If you get something like a crab pot line tangled a prop late in the fall or early in the spring, it certainly would be easier to cut the line hanging over the transom or swim platform. Your running gear isnt also as deep. A light grounding can be far more expensive in a twin inboard than an i/o. (Hard groundings you pay either way) i/o maintenance can be costly and time consuming but there is a reason Albemarle, Carolina Classic, True world Marine, Silverhawk, Hunt Yachts, etc all use em. Fast, efficient lower center of gravity and clean transom. Key is to use them, stay on top of maintenance, keep em painted, fresh zincs on and brush them down on occassion. The worst thing for an i/o is to not use it and get behind on its care. You also have to figure on replacing stuff from time to time too
 

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B-Faithfull is right on about frequent boat use to deter maintenance and to maintain good reliability. You may be hard to pursuade about single screw inboards but operating cost will be less than twins and with 1:1 drive it will troll down to 3K and below. Disadvantages are manauverability at dock and exhaust noise. I've had virtually no major maintenance on the drive train in twenty years. One key is keeping the shaft aligned and stuffing box packing adjusted correctly. Recently I've had success using zinc paint as antifouling and corrosion protection on rudder, prop, tabs and driveshaft.
 

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I have had mostly inboards but on small boats there is not much room for inboards and I perfer outboards. The problems I have had with small boats with inboard is when it comes time to work on the engines it is a pain to get around the engine. The shaft seals were a pain and always a worry. I have twin outboards and when I troll I try to fish with one engine because I catch better with one engine vs two. On calm days and light winds fishing with one engine is not any problems when the winds picks up to 3 ft seas ro better you need to stay on the wheel or use two engines.
 

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in some twin inboard setups do not run just one engine. the side that is off is not getting water to the shaft and it can still spin and heat up the seals too much.
 

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Trolling valves

Thanks for the reply's. Most every has advised me to get the inboards for the bay.
Reel fine time: Approximately how much would trolling valves cost to install.
When I had it done it ran right around 1500 per trans, but that was a few years ago. I had mine installed by Sarles boatyard in Annapolis, but I think they paid someone else to do the work. Like I said it weas a few years ago & I was having some other work done as well so I may be mistaken.

I ran "Cover Girl" (37' Egg) for 6 years in Annapolis & 5 more years in Va. Beach & never had a single issue with my screws, shafts, bearings or trannies. Not one red cent spent on repairs for those items. I did get the props reconditioned every other year & I replaced the shaft zincs & rudder zincs annually during haulout, but shoot, I do that with the outboard I have now. I don't now anyone who has a I/O that can make a claim like that !
 

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rocksandblues, I never understood that. First off a standard stuffing box drips all the time, engine running or not, so the shaft won't overheat in the box. IF the shaft on the non running engine wants to turn, it would turn so slow I can't imagine it damaging the trans. As a precaution you can drop the non running engine in gear to stop it from spinning. I think that's an old wives tale personally.
 
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