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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am sure all of you guys out there have this problem. Weeds that grow & grow ... you cut them and they just come back year after year. Now I'm talking about your typical weeds that grow around the house, garage, or shed ... I'm talking about the heavy duty weeds and blackberry bushes, tumbleweeds, etc that grow at the edge of the water edging up to your property. (for those of you on the water) Sorry, wish I had pics to show you. I will this weekend when I come down.
My question to you guys is .... is there anything you can put down to prevent these damn things from growing back year after year? I have cut them down and they just grow back thicker and thicker. Is there something called "Stop Rot" or "Stump Growth Killer" ... something that you lay down to stop the growth from coming back?? But a chemical, not a layer of cloth like you do in the garden. I have even tried burning it to the ground but that just encouraged it to grow. (just like the wildfires in the forest)
Any thoughts or recommendations would be greatly appreciated! I am at my wits end! :help:
 

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Try crossbow herbicide mixed with a wetting agent. It only kills broadleaf weeds and brush and will not harm grasses.
 

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Resource Protection Area

Be careful before cutting or poisoning vegetation near the waters edge. You could be in violation of local ordinances which are intended to prevent erosion and run-off of pollutants into the Bay. Below are a couple of sections of the codes in Lancaster County:

"RPA buffer area requirements.
(a)
To minimize the adverse effects of human activities on the other components of resource protection areas, state waters, and aquatic life, a 100-foot buffer area of vegetation that is effective in retarding runoff, preventing erosion, and filtering non-point source pollution from runoff shall be retained if present and established where it does not exist.

The RPA buffer shall be maintained in accordance with the following performance standards:
(1)
In order to maintain the functional value of the buffer area, indigenous vegetation may be removed to provide for reasonable sight lines, access paths, general woodlot management, and best management practices, if authorized by the director of planning, on a case-by-case basis, upon presentation of documentation that the RPA buffer will still function in a manner that protects water quality. Such vegetation shall be replaced with other vegetation that is equally effective in retarding runoff, preventing erosion, and filtering non-point source pollution from runoff."

Lots more details, but you can see from the sections above that you may be able to get some relief for views, but you are generally not allowed to clear out the vegetation within 100 feet of the water.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Be careful before cutting or poisoning vegetation near the waters edge. You could be in violation of local ordinances which are intended to prevent erosion and run-off of pollutants into the Bay. Below are a couple of sections of the codes in Lancaster County:

"RPA buffer area requirements.
(a)
To minimize the adverse effects of human activities on the other components of resource protection areas, state waters, and aquatic life, a 100-foot buffer area of vegetation that is effective in retarding runoff, preventing erosion, and filtering non-point source pollution from runoff shall be retained if present and established where it does not exist.

The RPA buffer shall be maintained in accordance with the following performance standards:
(1)
In order to maintain the functional value of the buffer area, indigenous vegetation may be removed to provide for reasonable sight lines, access paths, general woodlot management, and best management practices, if authorized by the director of planning, on a case-by-case basis, upon presentation of documentation that the RPA buffer will still function in a manner that protects water quality. Such vegetation shall be replaced with other vegetation that is equally effective in retarding runoff, preventing erosion, and filtering non-point source pollution from runoff."

Lots more details, but you can see from the sections above that you may be able to get some relief for views, but you are generally not allowed to clear out the vegetation within 100 feet of the water.

Tom
No one around me has the issue with the weeds that I do. I plan on ripping it all out and laying some boulders or rock there in its place ... after I burn it of course!
 

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There are herbicides like triclopyr or imazapyr that are labeled for wetland use targeting broadleaf (woody stemmed) bushes and trees. You can try either foliar application with a sprayer or, if you can cut the bush/tree off at its base, apply it full strength (right out of bottle) on the freshly cut trunk with a small paint brush. The latter method or basal application, can also be done with 41% glyphosate (Round-up) this time of year with decent success rates.

Not suggesting you break any nut-hugger laws or anything, just helping you to manage and protect your private property in a reasonable and minimally destructive way all without causing a cataclysmic event that would cause the planet to stop rotating and orbiting the sun!!!!

R
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
There are herbicides like triclopyr or imazapyr that are labeled for wetland use targeting broadleaf (woody stemmed) bushes and trees. You can try either foliar application with a sprayer or, if you can cut the bush/tree off at its base, apply it full strength (right out of bottle) on the freshly cut trunk with a small paint brush. The latter method or basal application, can also be done with 41% glyphosate (Round-up) this time of year with decent success rates.

Not suggesting you break any nut-hugger laws or anything, just helping you to manage and protect your private property in a reasonable and minimally destructive way all without causing a cataclysmic event that would cause the planet to stop rotating and orbiting the sun!!!!

R
I like it!!

Wouldn't want anything cataclysmic to occur on my watch! LOL
 

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There are herbicides like triclopyr or imazapyr that are labeled for wetland use targeting broadleaf (woody stemmed) bushes and trees. You can try either foliar application with a sprayer or, if you can cut the bush/tree off at its base, apply it full strength (right out of bottle) on the freshly cut trunk with a small paint brush. The latter method or basal application, can also be done with 41% glyphosate (Round-up) this time of year with decent success rates.

Not suggesting you break any nut-hugger laws or anything, just helping you to manage and protect your private property in a reasonable and minimally destructive way all without causing a cataclysmic event that would cause the planet to stop rotating and orbiting the sun!!!!

R
Indeed Ricochet. Otherwise, my house, which sits on a small finger point would look like one of those structures you see out in the country 100% covered by kudzu. Its a jungle out here!

kudzu.jpeg
 
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