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Im redoing my 15 ft. v-bottom as a winter project and was wondering what paint to use? Im looking to paint it carolina blue if possible and wanted yalls opinions on what type to use.. any info would be appreciated thanks..Brandon:thumbup:
 

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I had good luck with a 2-part polyurethane, but it is expensive and it was a new build project. I would suggest a one part polyurethane. If you are looking to save money check you local hardware store I am pretty sure that someone like Rust Oleum makes it at a cheaper price than what you find at marine parts stores.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had good luck with a 2-part polyurethane, but it is expensive and it was a new build project. I would suggest a one part polyurethane. If you are looking to save money check you local hardware store I am pretty sure that someone like Rust Oleum makes it at a cheaper price than what you find at marine parts stores.
thanks for the info Tom:thumbup:
 

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Jeff - Tom, others- I just hauled my boat down to the E. Shore to paint the outer strakes but couldn't get the garage temps up high enough even with a 23k kerosene plus 9k propane heater. Spring it is. I bought Interlux Perfection and Interlux epoxy primer. Any tips for the best finish with Perfection? Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Jeff - Tom, others- I just hauled my boat down to the E. Shore to paint the outer strakes but couldn't get the garage temps up high enough even with a 23k kerosene plus 9k propane heater. Spring it is. I bought Interlux Perfection and Interlux epoxy primer. Any tips for the best finish with Perfection? Jim
where did you buy the interlux perfection west marine??
 

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Jim
Be real carefull about applying Interlux Perfection--while it is good paint it is extremly hazardous-(isocyanate)-interlux recomends an airline respirator when applying perfection

had a neighbor that applied it to a boat last spring- he did it outside, with a roller & brush, without an airline respirator--took him weeks to get over the effects of inhaling the fumes, he swore he would never use it again!!

the interlux website has alot of info about applying their products

yachtpaint.com - the official site of International and Interlux paints
 

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Isn't that one that you have to measure by weight. If so I would suggest that you purchase a kitchen scale that indicates down to at least one's of grams. Write down the mix before you start the job. 150 resin, 50 hardener, 15 thinner . . . 150 . .. 200 . . . 215 It makes it easier not to screw it up.

I used epethanes two part polyurethane with a lot of success. I did it in the summer with all the doors open on my shop including two roll up doors fumes were not an issue. I doubt that I could do the job in the winter when the doors had to be closed for temperature reasons. Also mine were realtively small jobs. 16 foot kayaks.

Make sure that you thin it to the recommended amount. It may take an extra few coats but it will come out better.

Also pay attention to the time between coats. With the stuff I was using you can recoat within 24 (or was it 48) hours without sanding. This meant that I could do a light hand sanding with a block just to get rid of the drips, bugs, etc. in between coats rather than do a full fledged sanding. Waiting longer meant that I had to knock the gloss off of everything before applying the next coat. Not the way to build up a finish.

I applied like 5 coats to get a decent finish.

Prep work, prep work, prep work. . . is the key.

Oh and two more things.

3M Scotch Brand 218 fine line tape is the ticket for taping off areas. Anything less and the paint will wick under it and you will end up with a mess.

Added on to that the stuff eats up spar varnish (or any other paint for that matter). Which means two things. (1) if you are painting a boat that already has paint on it which is not 2 part polyeurathane, take the Perfection back to the store and buy 1-part paint. (2) paint first varnish (at least final coat) second.

I sealed my boats in epoxy prior to painting. On one I did the varnish work first and the paint caused it to rinkle so I ended up doing two more coats after I painted the boat. On the second I coated everything with epoxy painted the bottom; masked off the painted area with plastic held in place with regular masking tape; did the edges with 218 tape; then did the varnish work.
 

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Jim
Be real carefull about applying Interlux Perfection--while it is good paint it is extremly hazardous-(isocyanate)-interlux recomends an airline respirator when applying perfection

had a neighbor that applied it to a boat last spring- he did it outside, with a roller & brush, without an airline respirator--took him weeks to get over the effects of inhaling the fumes, he swore he would never use it again!!

the interlux website has alot of info about applying their products

yachtpaint.com - the official site of International and Interlux paints
Thanks. Good to know. I have a nice air supply respirator system with 50 ft. hose that I had to use because of my epoxy allergy. I'll use it for the Perfection as well. Had not planned it. Jim
 

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Isn't that one that you have to measure by weight. If so I would suggest that you purchase a kitchen scale that indicates down to at least one's of grams. Write down the mix before you start the job. 150 resin, 50 hardener, 15 thinner . . . 150 . .. 200 . . . 215 It makes it easier not to screw it up.

I used epethanes two part polyurethane with a lot of success. I did it in the summer with all the doors open on my shop including two roll up doors fumes were not an issue. I doubt that I could do the job in the winter when the doors had to be closed for temperature reasons. Also mine were realtively small jobs. 16 foot kayaks.

Make sure that you thin it to the recommended amount. It may take an extra few coats but it will come out better.

Also pay attention to the time between coats. With the stuff I was using you can recoat within 24 (or was it 48) hours without sanding. This meant that I could do a light hand sanding with a block just to get rid of the drips, bugs, etc. in between coats rather than do a full fledged sanding. Waiting longer meant that I had to knock the gloss off of everything before applying the next coat. Not the way to build up a finish.

I applied like 5 coats to get a decent finish.

Prep work, prep work, prep work. . . is the key.

Oh and two more things.

3M Scotch Brand 218 fine line tape is the ticket for taping off areas. Anything less and the paint will wick under it and you will end up with a mess.

Added on to that the stuff eats up spar varnish (or any other paint for that matter). Which means two things. (1) if you are painting a boat that already has paint on it which is not 2 part polyeurathane, take the Perfection back to the store and buy 1-part paint. (2) paint first varnish (at least final coat) second.

I sealed my boats in epoxy prior to painting. On one I did the varnish work first and the paint caused it to rinkle so I ended up doing two more coats after I painted the boat. On the second I coated everything with epoxy painted the bottom; masked off the painted area with plastic held in place with regular masking tape; did the edges with 218 tape; then did the varnish work.
Tom - I have 3 coats of West Systems epoxy over Okoume. Earlier this week, I mixed up the Interlux 2 part epoxy primer (link below) and brushed it on but ended up sanding it down the next day because it kept running like molasses. No end to the drips. Thankfully, I was able to sand it smooth and it left a thin layer - like plastic (thick stuff) but I need to buy more and do it again - in the Spring. This is something you want to do in 75 degrees or better temps. I learned the hard way. I used a 23k BTU kerosene heater and a 9k BTU Buddy Heater but just could not get it warm enough. You want that epoxy paint to dry much faster. More importantly, what you said about thinning the mix.... I'll go thin, thin, thin and more coats next time for sure. That is HUGE!!! Yes... 4-5 coats next time. The garage I used is great for this purpose when the weather improves. Boat fits in with lots of room to work around it, large windows on all sides. Just too big to heat without a pellet or wood stove. Jim

Epoxy Primekote For Perfection Polyurethane Paint from Wholesale Marine

ps - didn't mean to jack this thread
 

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Can I get away with standard thinner vs. Interlux reducing solvent ??$$$$$

Reducing Solvent from Wholesale Marine

The Interlux cans are fairly small so I bought 4 of them and should be able to mix and apply an entire can at a time without having to measure. I'm sure they do this for that reason. I'm thinking that thinned, I would be able to paint one coat of entire boat (just the outer strakes - transom and bottom are done) per can and I can buy a mixing bucket with lid to keep it fresh.

Make sense? Jim
 

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I just did my Whaler with Sterling. See the pictures in the Thread "My Boston Whaler" on this board.

It's very stinky to work with even outside and it's on the pricey side BUT, in terms of ease of rolling and the finish, It's phenomenal.

The application method I used was called roll and tip. Using a 1/8" thick foam roller and a high quality brush, you roll it on with the roller and then very lightly drag the brush across to knock the roller dimples down. The paint does the rest.

If done right (The thinnner the coats the better), the finish is comparable to a pocrcelain tub. It's on the pricey side, but in my opinion it was worth it. The 2 QTs of color that if I remember right produces a total of 1 Gallon due to the mix ratios, ran me $275. Sterling is a 3 Part system mixed by volume, 2 Color, 1 Thinner and 1 part reducer for the brushing.

Chris

On the flip side, Interlux Perfection is also supposed to be very nice and is designed as a roll and tip paint.
 

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Thanks Chris. Your Whaler looks great and I would take your advice... Problem is that I have 4 cans of Interlux Perfection that have mud, goop, dents from shuttling them from my home, to truck to garage where I was prepping boat... i.e. non-returnable. I just saw a 50k BTU kerosene heater on sale for $149 at Northern but I guess I'll just wait for Spring. Have a great weekend. Jim
 

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Jim,

I would buy the recommended thinner. From the smell it is certainly not the same as regular paint thinner. More like a combination Naphtha, acetone, etc. You can pull the MSDS from the company's web site and maybe see what is in it. Maybe it is different with interlux as compared to epethanes, but I doubt it.

Also I would be hesitant to use a flame producing heater with this stuff for fear of explosions.
 

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Makes good sense. Can I also use it with the primer coat? Assume so, just checking. That epoxy primer is THICK. Thanks Tom.
 

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All I can say is ask the manufacturer of the primer regarding the proper thinner.

I did not use any primer on my boats. I just sanded with 80 grit paper and washed it down with fresh water before I applied the 2-part polyurethane. It seemed to stick OK. However the finish was not PERFECTLY smooth. There were still some creases, etc. where did not have things perfectly smooth before I painted he boats.

From what I could tell the primer was more of a leveling compound than something to make it stick better. If that is the intent thicker is better as you are going to sand most of it off before you coat with the 2-part stuff.

Paints have come a long way from "just use off the shelf paint thinner" and thin out what you are going to use in the next few days kind of varnish/paint.
 

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Jim

Tom is right. I would be very hesitant to stray from the recommended components without first checking with the manufacturer.

I don't know how the Interlux is, but the Sterling when properly mixed and thinned went A LONG WAY. Just for referance, the sales rep told me that if I mixed 4/2/2 ounces (Color, catalyst, and brushing thinner) that I would have enough to do the entire topside of the whaler. I have to say that if I had applied as I should have, that would have been enough for one coat. I applied heavy to cover up my rushed surface prep.

Sterling and I am sure Interlux as well is meant to be applied in VERY THIN coats. It is worth it in the end.

When I was talking with the Sterling Rep, he told me the big diff. in paint jobs between top notch paint jobs on yachts and those on smaller "cheap" boats is the number of coats. The cheap boat may have 3-4 coats while the custom yacht will have 7-8. They're just applied much thinner to help them run out and level better.

I can recommend a pretty decent primer, that I used. It made by System 3 and goes on very nice and sands "baby butt" smooth with almost no effort from 220 grit. Price is about $100 gallon.

Chris
 

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I ordered more Interlux 2-part primer plus two cans of the Interlux brand thinner (reducer) last night. I had problems with the primer because of thickness and temperature but hopefully I can correct both of those problems and move forward in late March or whenever it gets past 70. I'll put it back in the same garage and try again, armed with more knowledge.
 

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Tom - Yes, maybe the thicker primer with some sanding is a good thing. Once the weather improves, I will test a section using a small amount of the reducing agent. My main challenge was that it took way too long for the primer to set-up and there was nothing I could do about runs except stay there for hours, smoothing it out. Needed a lot more heat. Jim
 
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