Tidal Fish Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've picked my 'yak (tarpon 140 angler), I'm fabricating a set of rack mounts for my truck, and the gear is set and ready to go.
Now for the next big question. How to stay warm/dry in this until things warm up. I can't wait that long to fish.
Under other circumstances my neoprene waders and wading jacket do just fine in these cold temps. But I'm concerned as to how cumbersum, or even safe they would be while paddling. I've been looking at dry tops, but it's all greek to me right now.
Are waders even safe if you do topple in? And how does on go about sizing a PFD over all this?
Any help would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
I recommend a set of breathable waders, that are around $99.00 at bass Pro. Wear some polypro underneath and put your PFD on so that your waders will not fill up with water should you tumble out. Also pick up a hot seat from Appomattox or WRO for $25.00 and it glues to your seat. You can use it year round as a cushion too. Wear some smartwool socks and liners too to keep your feet warm, and paddle with gloves on and take them off to fish. make sure you can do simple task in your gear while on the ground before you hit the water. I've worn too much before and was scared the whole night on the water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
575 Posts
What Juke said except don't spend the money for breathable waders if you already have some neoprene ones. They are warmer and provide some bouyancy in the water, and the best part, you don't have to spend the money. If you can fork out about $150, get a semi-dry top.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info so far. In looking at semi/dry tops is there any one in particular better than the others? Fit, mobility, durability. The one difficulty I have in buying jackets is that I'm a skinny guy with really long arms. Unless it's a tall size (even then it's sometimes iffy), once the sleeves are long enough, you can fit a friend inside the jacket. I don't want to be getting hung up on a bunch of excess fabric.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
Would someone please explain to me why you'd wear waders in/on a kayak?? Wet is wet and I'd rather not have that extra weight on me should they fill up.I've had my new tarpon out a few times and I used my Swifty around Lynnhaven and have yet to get my feet wet.

Just curious

DARREN
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Just my two cents:

I'm a die hard wetsuit guy because I've been surfing year round since 1967. When I launch in the surf, I'm going to be wearing a wetsuit. I have a farmer john that's big enough to wear long johns under and I wear splash pants and top over when it's really cold. Lately in skinny water I've been wearing waders with long johns undeneath and a splash top over them. I may try them in the bay on a fairly calm day. The only way I've been able to tell if the gear is suitable is to actually get in the water with it on. The water in the bay and ocean is about 45 degrees right now. If your gear is not suitable, you'll know right away. I have a rope with a carabiner attached to my PFD and a buddy on the other end ready to haul me in and I just jump in. It's great entertainment for my buddy and very educational. If you haven't done that, you'll never really know if your gear is suitable until you're in the water when you're fishing one day. It could be a rude surprise. If you're like I am, you'll eventually find youself fishing in weather you wouldn't wish on your worst enemy. I guess what I'm saying is...do your homework before fishing in cold water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Why we wear waders? Wet is wet, but if your in waders, you are not wet! You get wet when you paddle, or reel in a fish. With waders on you are not. We don't wear waders in case we fall out. We wear waders to keep warm while we are in. We wear breathable, because its easier to swim with them on if you go in. You can also wear the breathable in the summer when you wade in saltwater, to assist in protecting you from those little brown cow nose rays and his cousins with the pointy tails. In Texas and some parts of Florida you don't wade in shorts because of jelly fish and such. Many use their yak as a floating tackle box and get out to wade the bank and sight fish. They can see better standing than they can in the yak. You can wear your polypro underneath and it stays dry. Thats a few of the reasons I can think of off the top of my head. If your staying dry then don't wear them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
Those are some good reasons.I'l look in to getting some. when you go over in them with a pfd on what keeps them from filling up?I have hip waders , but I dont think they are a good idea.

thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,381 Posts
[Q]nsfratu originally wrote:
I've picked my 'yak (tarpon 140 angler), I'm fabricating a set of rack mounts for my truck, and the gear is set and ready to go.
Now for the next big question. How to stay warm/dry in this until things warm up. I can't wait that long to fish.
Under other circumstances my neoprene waders and wading jacket do just fine in these cold temps. But I'm concerned as to how cumbersum, or even safe they would be while paddling. I've been looking at dry tops, but it's all greek to me right now.
Are waders even safe if you do topple in? And how does on go about sizing a PFD over all this?
Any help would be appreciated.
[/Q]

Try these sites for information;

http://www.nrsweb.com/Cold_Water_Layering.asp

http://www.nrsweb.com/hypothermia.asp

http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/faqs.asp#coldwater

Dry suits do not provide thermal protection so you'll need to wear clothing underneath.

Wet suits provide thermal protection in that once the water is in the suit between you and the suit it warms up and then between that and the wet suit a thermal barrier is formed to keep you warm. You will need a top and pants on over the wet suit to keep the wind off you once out of the water.

A lot of guys use waders and a dry top. Be sure to ask what kind of waders as some of these wader dry top combinations that keep you alive in cold water can run upwards of about $700 to $800 or so.

You are wearing this equipment to save you if you go in the water, not to keep you warm and comfy in the yak. I paddled this past Monday. I choose to use a 3 mm Farmer John wetsuit with a 2 mm shorty suit over that. This gives me 5 mm around my torso section. I use a waterproof paddling top and bib type coverall rain gear pants. This keeps the wind chill off me. I am plenty warm in the wetsuit - in fact you can get a bit sweaty and I did this past Monday.

I wear a full hood by Northwest River Systems for heat retention. 50% of your body heat can be lost thru the top of your head. By having the hood on I am warm while paddling and if I suddenly go over, I don't have to worry about whether it's on or not. It will then keep me warm after I'm wet.

I used to dive in the winter in NJ years ago using a 3/8" thick wet suit. Now it's measured in millimeters so a 3/8" suit is now referred to as a 9.5 mm suit. Difference is having the thickness I used to use in the winter and what I'm using now is that when diving I was staying in the water for about 30 to 45 minutes at a time. The 5 mm around the torso is sufficient for the 1 to 2 minutes you might be in the water if you fall out of your yak.

A dry suit is a very good way to go also.

EDIT: One other thing. If I get a tear in my waders or dry suit and fall in 43 degree water (last time I looked it was this temperature in the river) it's a major item - now I'm wet and the suit is full. If I get a tear in my wet suit it is an inconvenience.

Just remember this if using something other than a wet suit. Be careful you get no holes. It'd be nicer to fall in and not have the water ooze into your suit (dry suit), but if you get a hole or a tear you'll fill up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
the whole myth about waders filling up and you sinking to the bottom is a myth. the water in your waders is no heavier than the water you are in... they aren't going to feel heavy until you get out of the water. unbuckle 'em when you get level with the sand or yak. ask me how i know [grin]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I wear my breathable waders and just bought a Immersion Research Semi-dry top on sale from REI for $65. Tested it out Jan, 2nd on the James River below Richmond. Water temp was 44, air temp to start was about 38, climbing to 50 by the PM. Oh and it rained 4 out of the 6 hours I was on the water. I had on poly sock liners with med wool treking socks, light wt. poly long undies top and bottom, thin nylon hiking pants, med wt poly fleece. I took the paddle guys suggestion at REI and put the wader belt on top of the Semi-dry top. With my PDF I was just comfortable. I did get warm on the way back paddling the 2.5 miles against the tide, but even with the sweat and cooler wx never got chilled. Poly rules. cotton drools.
Most PFDs have enough straps and adjustments I have not had a problem with the extra winter layers.
Yakgeek
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Remember Sandtiger said[q] You are wearing this equipment to save you if you go in the water, not to keep you warm and comfy in the yak.[/q]

I do not share his opinion.

I'm trying to be safe and comfortable. If you have to wear all that heavy apparal to go fishing, go in a BOAT not a yak. I personally don't want to go into the water because I cannot maneuver with a lot of heavy clothing on. I like to keep it light and comfortable. I don't carry 90 lbs of gear on the Appalachian trail, I don't bring 12 rods fishing, and I dont wear 30 lbs of clothes IN CASE "I fall in the water". I like to be Warm and Comfortable and light so I don't fall in the water. I find it hard rto maneuver witha wetsuit or dry suit on. Use your head, test your options, and form your own opinions as many of us have. You can sit in the front yard with your ayk and see how easy or hard it is to get to your rods, or paddle your yak. But when you get in the water, you have to balance a little too. i find it harder with too much gear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
[Q]Juke originally wrote:
Remember Sandtiger said[q] You are wearing this equipment to save you if you go in the water, not to keep you warm and comfy in the yak.[/q]

I do not share his opinion.

I'm trying to be safe and comfortable. If you have to wear all that heavy apparal to go fishing, go in a BOAT not a yak. I personally don't want to go into the water because I cannot maneuver with a lot of heavy clothing on. I like to keep it light and comfortable. I don't carry 90 lbs of gear on the Appalachian trail, I don't bring 12 rods fishing, and I dont wear 30 lbs of clothes IN CASE "I fall in the water". I like to be Warm and Comfortable and light so I don't fall in the water. I find it hard rto maneuver witha wetsuit or dry suit on. Use your head, test your options, and form your own opinions as many of us have. You can sit in the front yard with your ayk and see how easy or hard it is to get to your rods, or paddle your yak. But when you get in the water, you have to balance a little too. i find it harder with too much gear.
[/Q]

I hope you don't catch any heavy fish to haul back to the lanuch site. That would be very uncomfortable and restricting and hard to maneuver and balance. [grin]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,381 Posts
[Q]Juke originally wrote:
Remember Sandtiger said[q] You are wearing this equipment to save you if you go in the water, not to keep you warm and comfy in the yak.[/q]

I do not share his opinion.

I'm trying to be safe and comfortable. If you have to wear all that heavy apparal to go fishing, go in a BOAT not a yak. I personally don't want to go into the water because I cannot maneuver with a lot of heavy clothing on. I like to keep it light and comfortable. I don't carry 90 lbs of gear on the Appalachian trail, I don't bring 12 rods fishing, and I dont wear 30 lbs of clothes IN CASE "I fall in the water". I like to be Warm and Comfortable and light so I don't fall in the water. I find it hard rto maneuver witha wetsuit or dry suit on. Use your head, test your options, and form your own opinions as many of us have. You can sit in the front yard with your ayk and see how easy or hard it is to get to your rods, or paddle your yak. But when you get in the water, you have to balance a little too. i find it harder with too much gear.
[/Q]

You are allowed your opinion of course, but I hope you never end up in cold water and lose the yak - a possibility. I am not an expert in the kayak fishing sport, but in my opinion, I try to perpare myself for worst case scenario; in cold water, lost the yak, and now I must swim. To date, I do not go out on big open water in the winter time.

Total clothes I wear: Wet suit, paddling jacket, full 0.5 mm hood (like a helmet liner), pull on bib coveralls (offshore rainsuit pants), wet suit boots, and hat. Yup, that weighs a lot (at least a couple of pounds) and really restricts my movement (not at all). Weight-wise I probably have about the same weight or less in gear as a person with waders; not counting the clothing under the waders. My paddling jacket is water-proof and therefore wind-proof keeping your body from wind chill.

It keeps me warm and if I go in yes I'll get wet, but not suffer from gasp reflex (body's reaction to cold water and people drown from it) due to no heavy inrush of cold water and so on. Waders may be fine, but I know what my wet suit is capable of and if I lose my yak I'll still be able to swim. [grin]

People asked a question here about what to wear in the cold and I tried to give them the way I prepare myself along with a few others I described to survive in cold water. If you read the articles on the links I provided you will see what profesionals in the sport have to say on the subject. If you want to put people down for opinions, no problem, but be nice to the folks who are trying to learn.......... [wink]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Sandtiger, you bit me, I bit back. You sound pretty hypocritical. You put down my opinion in your post, I just disagreed with yours. Still do. I guess its OK when you do it, and wrong with someone disagrees with yours. I've tried your opinion and it wasn't working for me, and frankly I was scared to death that I was going to die from the lack of freedom of movement and don't want to suffer through that again. Thank god the gentlemen in TKAA have provided me with proven methods that have helped me to enjoy kayak fishing far more than I would had I been less informed. I'm glad that they openly share their experiences with me and the others that want to listen.

I encourage everyone to gather as much information as you can then make and informed decision that will fit your style of fishing. No matter what you wear, top it off with your PFD.

George Z, I don't bring back big fish, I release them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,381 Posts
[Q]Juke originally wrote:
Sandtiger, you bit me, I bit back.
[/Q]
Okay, if you say so. I didn't quote you or even address your post; just stated my thoughts on the subject. Quite sensitive I guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'm sorry all.
I didn't mean to stir up some big debate or invoke animosity between the members.
I started reading this forum last year because you all seemed like a very knowledgable group willing to share your findings and experiences with novices such as myself to save me some of the growing pains you experienced. Maybe that was selfish of me, I didn't mean to start any feuds.
I've read all of your posts and have taken it all into consideration.
I do feel I can now make an informed decision.
Thank you for your help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
We have no animosity. Most of us know each other and are just taking jabs. We do it in public too. Some of us have travled from Virginia Beach, VA to Tampa,FL overnight and started fishing at sunrise in Tampa, and came home at sunset 3 days later. Don't worry, Be happy!
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top