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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i am a fisherman who targets pups, specks, rocks, blues and many other fish that can be taken of fly. this summer and fall i found some great pup holes and i was thinking of how great it would be to caatch them on flys. i am also thinking about how great stripers would be to catch on flys. I currently do not know how to fly fish and i pretty much dont know where to start. What size rod do i need to target these species, what kid of flies do i need, what type of line do i need. I am just a kid wanting to get started with something that seems pretty cool to me and if anyone has any tips i would love to hear them.


Thanks
 

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I would consider taking a trip or two with some of the great Cbay guides that cater to flyfisherman/women, perfect time to do this. This will allow you to use their equipment, flies and get some pointers on casting, etc. Two great guides I know are Matty J- Tommy Mattioli
and Bay Flyfishing Chris Newsome


John
 

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I primarily use 2 rods on the bay - an 8 weight and a 9 weight. Either weight would be a choice to start. There are many choices of lines available from floating to sinking. It's important to have one full sink line that get down 20 feet or so. It's also good to have a floating line for surface lures or shallow water. I also have an intermediate full sink that I use quite often. It's a great line for shallow water 10 feet or less & breaking fish. To get started, you may want to go with a floating and a deep sink. You can purchase one reel w/ 2 spools to accomodate the two lines. I would suggest going to a fly shop and asking for some assistance. You can get by with a handful of flies from deceivers to clouser minnows in various colors and sizes. Down the road, you may decide to start tying your own flies. Saltwater stuff is pretty easy to tie and it will save you some money in the long run. You may also want to check out local library. There are a lot of great books on flyfishing that will help you get started. Good luck. Once you master the basics of casting a fly rod, you'll have a blast catching fish on the fly.

Chris Detweiler - Harrisburg, PA
 

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I can only echo what others have said on equipment selection, working with local shop and/or fishing with a guide (not throwing a plug in for myself either).

Good luck and go out and try fly fishing, lots of fun. You don't have to spend a mint either. Just a good rod, average reel, couple spools/lines, basic flies and your set. Yard practice is good and fishing with and around others will help you greatly improve technique.

Dont know where you're located but I'll throw out a plug for my good friend Mason and his shop: Salisbury Fly Shop...You one stop for Saltwater/Freshwater FlyFishing supplies
Don't let anyone or shop talk you into high dollar stuff. Tell them a budget and ask for the basics of a good saltwater outfit. Great expense or a poor casting setup is a fast discouragement to an otherwise simple and enjoyable means of fishing.
 

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Hey Drewman
You have just gotten some very good advice, I just want to add that joining a local fly fishing club is very helpful. Most fly guy are very willing to share info plus you will make some life long friends. I use mostly a 9wt because i also fish the ocean surf and it is better in the wind, but an 8wt would be good too. You can also look into a used setup and see if you like it before you spend a bunch of money on gear. I have been fly fishing for 3 years and really love it, but it can be frustrating at first but it gets way better as you become a better caster. Despite what alot of people tell you it is not that hard to learn it just takes some practice be patient and enjoy it.
Jim W
 

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Re: good books. When I started a few years ago, I found Inshore Fly Fishing by Lou Tabory very helpful as a general introduction and reference. He covers equipment, flies, strategies, what to look for in locations, etc. Since I first read that book, there has been a landslide of new books. I'm sure some of them are good, as well.
 

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It's difficult to cast large weighted flies with a 5 weight rod. In order to cast sinking lines and large flies, I would still suggest an 8 or 9 weight rod. A five weight rod is a better choice for trout or panfish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
alright ill keep looking. I kinda know how to cast because my unlce taught me when i was really little and i kinda remember, dont move should or wrist only your elbow from 11 to 1. thats all i remember but i think if i got a rod i could teach myslef from that basic knowlege
 

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As sugggested, 8-9 wgt. is best for all around use as it is better suited for stronger fish, casting heavier flies and casting more commonly used sinking lines which would otherwise snap a 5 wgt. You'll have no problem learning to cast, casting a sinking line well just takes a little practice and is really quite easy. You might also try posting on here about looking for an outfit or at least a rod as folks are often upgrading equipment and may sell for a reasonable price. Essentially you just need a rod and reel suited for saltwater enviromnet so its not as prone to rust/corrosion. Give my friend Mason at Salisbury Fly Shop...You one stop for Saltwater/Freshwater FlyFishing supplies a call and he may be able to set you up with a new/used complete outfit for $200 or less. Its not always possible but many times it is to get a nice 9' 8-9 wgt. basic reel and line. I know as I've given him equipment in the past to sell and he almost always has demo lines he has used personally or in the shop for testing that he'll sell or include for free when getting and outfit. St. Croix, Temple Forks and others all have very moderately priced, good equipment.
 

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Casting

I kinda know how to cast because my unlce taught me when i was really little and i kinda remember, dont move should or wrist only your elbow from 11 to 1. thats all i remember but i think if i got a rod i could teach myslef from that basic knowlege
Most trout are caught close - so distance casting is relatively unimportant. For saltwater, however, it's helpful to be able to cast long. (I'm still learning!) I'd say start by yourself, but then find a friend who's willing to watch your casts and give you some tips, join a club, study the books, take a class, etc.
 
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