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It is my thought that most things happen for a reason. The trophy season has not been good for the fishermen but has been good for the fish. The first week was a raining blow out which led more fish to be able to spawn out. The dirty water has slowed catching in the bay and shut down the flats. Since we are having a problem fixing the decline, maybe Mother Nature has her own ideas. just a thought...........Gary
 

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Thanks for the link. Eyes in the sky has been down. Just posted a question for this, and what do you know, you post exactly what I'm lookin for, thanks. Looks like no real clear water until PLO, or eastern side around solomons!
 

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Maybe it's wishful thinking on my part, but I feel better about the water clarity later this week with it looking less muddy above the Patapsco than it does near the bridge. Once that big slug of mud works it's way south, then things ought to look better after that, particularly south of the Bridge as the mud gets diluted by cleaner water flowing from other rivers. This of course assumes that the rains hold off and they don't open up dam full blast again. But maybe I'm staring too hard at that pic too.
 

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I'm with you Gary. The exponential upswing in the past few seasons of 14 rod spreads on planers have resulted in a hell of a lot of pressure and the fishery badly needed at least a little bit of a break!
 

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regarding clear water in Patapsco - i've been sold the idea that it's urban/suburban development that causes all the runoff. does that make sense with the image? i have seen pics of mud coming out of rivers after big storms but i think that satellite pic is worth a thousand words.
 

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hippie do you have the link to the current and foretasted water flow chart for coniwingo?
 

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Today's shot shows some improvement between the flats and just above Rock Hall. Still stained but not as bad. Perhaps by next weekend it might be a bit better. Think I might try bait instead of trolling next weekend.....

John
 

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Just crossed conowingo dam about an hour ago, very little letdown. Below the dam is nice and calm. Help is on the way!
 

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I'm with you on this one, too, Gary
Mother Nature is trying to help
let's hope she did a good job!

regarding clear water in Patapsco - i've been sold the idea that it's urban/suburban development that causes all the runoff. does that make sense with the image? i have seen pics of mud coming out of rivers after big storms but i think that satellite pic is worth a thousand words.
urban/suburban areas do indeed cause increased runoff
the runoff is produced by large percentages of paved surfaces, etc. causing runoff to go directly into the tributaries instead of slowly working its way down through the ground
it just does not produce as much mud
 

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Just for the heck of it decided to try above the bridge(swan point) sat. the only way a fish would take a lure is if it got pissed off by gettin hit in the head by the first lure of a tandem and bit the second. can u say starbucks coffee? that's about the color of the water. water is deffinately clearer in the patapsco then the bay, since I run out of sparrows pt it was easy to see the change. didn't hit anything resambling the usual bay green till below the brige about a mile.
 

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i believe the water runoff idea ok. makes me sick when i walk across home depot lot on a rainy day and see all the oily water draining towards bay. i used to boat out of furnace creek/curtis bay and remember seeing long drifts of trash at key bridge area from out of baltimore streets after big rain.

that is a lot of mud from conwingo dam/ susky river now. but above there is not nearly as developed as baltimore/patapsco river for example. is agriculture worse for bay than pavement in that respect? i mean -i'm just looking at the satellite pic and that looks like the 500# sediment gorilla in the room.
 

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Looks like no more gates for a while.:thumbup: Hoping the flats and bay clear up in a few days!dancedance Hookin Up, this may be the link you want for river forecasts>http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/glan...3356&view=1,1,1,1,1,1&toggles=10,7,8,2,9,15,6 If you click all on the left column and then stage forecast graph on the right, then scroll down and click Make My River page you get forecasts all the way down the river.
 

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Speculation: I "believe" the nitrogen runoff from the upper bay/susquehanna area has a more severe impact than oil/trash from the city. While the oil/trash is more visible, the invisible chemical impact of fertilizer runoff kills more swimming creatures. My 2 cents.
 

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Eastern Bay looked like chocolate milk tonight...difference is, chocolate milk is good...the mud is bad for more reasons than making the fishing difficult. There is literally a mountain of nitrogen and phosphorus sitting behind that dam and it is near or already at capacity. This is somewhat of a dated study but relevant nonetheless. http://pa.water.usgs.gov/reports/wrir97-4138.pdf

Paragraph 1 on page 2 says it all. The mud being released from the dam is going to have far reaching implications for the bay this summer.
 

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i was in ebay yesterday evening - not good, but not the worse water i've seen and it only looked better as sun dropped! but no big fish for me, or anyone else that i could tell.

thanks for the link. i think these are the par's you refer to (at bottom). i guess there's larger contributions in 'unusual' flood years? if understand; 2nd par 'scour' refers to collected sediment being removed from behind dam and into the bay?

assuming that's right and this is a big scour year, i think you're right - bay will probably get worser grades (sediment, increase of light-blocking algae, depleted O2, loss of sub-aquatic vegetation).

and we'll hear oystermen wanting to 'renew' oyster beds, by scraping the oysters out. has dnr researched and taken a fact-based position on that?

ABSTRACT
The Susquehanna River drains about 27,510 square miles in New York,
Pennsylvania, and Maryland, contributes nearly 50 percent of the freshwater discharge to
the Chesapeake Bay, and contributes nearly 66 percent of the annual nitrogen load,
40 percent of the phosphorus load, and 25 percent of the suspended-sediment load from
non-tidal parts of the Bay during a year of average streamflow. A reservoir system formed
by three hydroelectric dams on the lower Susquehanna River is currently trapping a major
part of the phosphorus and suspended-sediment loads from the basin and, to a lesser
extent, the nitrogen loads.
In the summer of 1996, the U. S. Geological Survey collected bathymetric data along
64 cross sections and 40 bottom-sediment samples along 14 selected cross sections in the
lower Susquehanna River reservoir system to determine the remaining sediment-storage
capacity, refine the current estimate of when the system may reach sediment-storage
capacity, document changes in the reservoir system after the January 1996 flood, and
determine the remaining nutrient mass in Conowingo Reservoir. Results from the 1996
survey indicate an estimated total of 14,800,000 tons of sediment were scoured from the
reservoir system from 1993 (date of previous bathymetric survey) through 1996. This
includes the net sediment change of 4,700,000 tons based on volume change in the
reservoir system computed from the 1993 and 1996 surveys, the 6,900,000 tons of sediment
deposited from 1993 through 1996, and the 3,200,000 tons of sediment transported into the
reservoir system during the January 1996 flood. The January 1996 flood, which exceeded a
100-year recurrence interval, scoured about the same amount of sediment that normally

would be deposited in the reservoir system during a 4- to 6-year period.
 

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and we'll hear oystermen wanting to 'renew' oyster beds, by scraping the oysters out. has dnr researched and taken a fact-based position on that?
Preliminary studies have shown more harm than good from dredging the beds, but there is a study proposed/underway as part of the Oyster plan started last year to provide more concrete data. The duration of the study is 5 years.

Here is some other info on dredging study:
http://www.tidalfish.com/forums/showthread.php/296639-Oyster-Power-Dredge-Study
 
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