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Not sure how long. It was a long time ago. Chincoteague flounder fish. Never knew what it was. But suspected a ray. Easy 30 minutes. Storm coming in on us and Cap insisted on putting pressure. Line broke. Disappointed 15 yr old. Hardest fight was 6 ft mako of Outer Banks while fishing for tuna.
 

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My longest fish fight happened about 20 yrs ago. Me and 3 friends were fishing Wachaprague for spring flounder. We stayed out longer than we should and while my friend was driving the boat back in low light, he started going up the wrong fork/creek. My other friend yelled turn right so he ran us way up onto a mud flat during an outgoing tide. We had no warm clothes, no food and very little beer. We all spent the night freezing on an open 18 ft boat waiting for high tide.

I called my wife to tell her I would not be coming home. That (fishing trip) fight lasted several days and I could not adjust the drag. She moved out and we got divorced. Best fish fight of my life.
 

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I fought a big Thresher shark off OC for 11 hours - was fishing alone.

Hooked it up at 3 pm - leader broke at hook about 2 am. Had it up to boat a few times but no way to leader it and gaff or harpoon it.
Damn Skip, did you try to phone a friend? I would imagine a number of guys would be happy to lend a hand to help you land it.
 

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Bucktales - No one else was out there until about 1 am - boat jogging east. Got them on VHF but charter captain could not help - needed to have his clients out deep at day break.

My plan was to get help when " the fleet " would be going by 4 to 5 am.
 

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How about the shortest fight. Wa# reeling in a small fish off of Vilano Beach, Fla. when a tarpon hit it. The tarpon was hooked for a nano second.
I’ve never timed a fight but the longest I ever fought and landed a fish was a foul hooked tuna at the Hot Dog off of OC. Seemed like an eternity.
 

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OK, I'll play along again. Shortest fight for me was a huge musky that hit so close to the kayak I could've touched it with the rod tip. I was smallmouth fishing in the Susquehanna and not equipped for a hit like that. It was about 10 seconds of drag screaming then he turned, and the line caught on rocks and rubbed through.
Shortest I've seen was when my father fouled hooked a Dall's Porpoise in Alaska. The reel was screaming to the point where I wouldn't have been surprised if smoke started coming out. The captain was standing next to him and cussed the porpoise then put scissors to the line and it was over. There was no reeling in an 8 foot porpoise.
 

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We fought a cow nose ray over a dozen years ago for an hour and 15 minutes. We were trolling for rockfish in July when three rods got hit by rays. One dropped off immediately, and it took 15 minutes to being the second one in. We never saw the third one.

I've fought several 40 to 50 pound yellowfin off of North Carolina for about 30 minutes, including one that threw the hook just as the mate was getting the gaff. I was quoted to say " I have unfinished business in Oregon Inlet after that one got away.

I fought a 30 inch channel cat at Great Falls on 6 lb test years ago for about 20 minutes. I could hear these girls behind me and up on the rocks whispering. I got the feeling that I was faking the long fight to get their attention, but when I lifted the beast out of the water, the girls gave me a standing ovation.
 

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In looking at the title of the original post "Your longest fish fight...", it offers two interpretations. As most of the respondents have assumed, this could well mean the longest amount of time (minutes) for which you fought a fish. For me, I am not sure. I have fought yellowfin and bluefin tuna off the Virginia coast for 45 to 60 mins with stand-up tackle while fishing on friend's boats.

In 2003, I hooked a 170-lb tarpon near Boca Grande. This was day 2 of our fishing with that guide. He had instructed the mate at the end of day 1 to respool the reel with fresh line. The mate was careless and bypassed the first (largest) guide on the 7' heavy spinning rod. I ended up fighting that huge fish with only the outer half of the rod. After nearly an hour, I had a big blister on my hand, and could not get the fish all the way in. It would come to the surface and gulp air to reoxygenate itself, then blast out again. Eventually I got it close enough to touch the leader before the fish broke loose.

When fighting a large fish from a kayak, I am concentrating on doing things right and don't pay much attention to the elapsed time as the adrenaline flows. In 2019, I caught a 100-lb tarpon in Biscayne Bay. That fish pulled me half a mile and made several jumps before I got it in. The fight could have been 20, 30, or 60 mins -- I don't really know.

Last April, I was pedaling a kayak two miles out in the ocean off of Boynton Beach when I hooked a sailfish. The guide had set the drag loose and did not want me loosening it. That was a long and physically tiring fight. We estimated the sailfish at 80 lbs.

Having given those examples, I go back to the title and realize that it could equally well be interpreted as how long (in inches) was the largest fish you ever fought. Again, I don't know for sure. The tarpon described above was estimated at 5'8", the sailfish at 6'6", and my largest lemon shark at about 5'. When fishing in a kayak, it is not easy or prudent to bring such large fish into the kayak to get an accurate measurement. I rely on the guide's estimate of length.
On that same trip, I hooked a spinner shark that was probably more than 6' long. It tore off at least 75 yards in a few seconds, leaped into the air and spun around before splashing, and nearly spooled me. I could not slow that fish down -- it soon broke off.

Probably the longest fish I ever had on the line was a sturgeon. I hired a guide to fish in the Fraser River in British Columbia. We spent a long day on the river with only a single bite. The fish took the bait and moved off slowly. I felt the weight for 10 seconds, then the fish was gone. That fish could have been 7' or more -- I'll never know.

With the prolonged cold weather, I have not been fishing at all this month, and probably will not get back on the water until some time in February. Reminiscing about the good fishing trips I made over the years (such as the ones described above) help to keep me looking ahead to warmer times.
 
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